UPANDOUT35

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April 2009



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taken June 29, 2008 248 pounds



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DJ4HEALTH
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  • v HONEYBEE56
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    Most people associate Eggs with Easter because of culture. Whether you eat eggs or not, here are a few facts regarding eggs (that you probably already know, but humor me :))

    We know that the components of serum cholesterol (from a blood test) include HDL (good cholesterol) and LDL (bad cholesterol). People who consume one or two eggs a day show no effects on serum levels. Eggs contain 14 vitamins and minerals and are a source of lecithin and essential fatty acids.

    Eggs contain vitamins, A, D, E, B1, B2, B6, B12, folate and pantothenic acid (B5) as well as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron and zinc. 71 calories, no carbohydrates and five grams of fat! They also contain all nine essential amino acids necessary for proper metabolism.

    The lecithin found in eggs emulsifies fats and improves digestion. It supports liver function, reduces the chance of cholesterol-clogged arteries and prevents the formation of kidney and gallstones. It also serves as a source of choline and inositol, which support proper nerve transmission and brain function.
    Be aware that salmonella bacteria, usually transferred on the eggshell surface, are common in poultry in North America. It’s best to use cooked eggs. Wash your hands when handling eggshells, and refrigerate eggs or egg preparations as soon as possible.

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    3828 days ago

    Comment edited on: 3/29/2010 1:01:02 PM
  • v HONEYBEE56
    Just popping in to say "hi!" and see how you are doing!

    Always remember emoticon and to keep on keeping on!

    emoticon Dusty emoticon emoticon emoticon

    3833 days ago
  • v HONEYBEE56
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    Thank you for the 4 leaf clover sparkgoodie!

    May your blessings outnumber
    The shamrocks that grow,
    And may trouble avoid you
    Wherever you go.

    May the best day of your past
    Be the worst day of your future.

    Go mbeannai Dia duit
    (May God Bless You)

    HAPPY ST PATRICK'S DAY!
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    3840 days ago
  • v HONEYBEE56
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    Can you believe it's almost the middle of March already? I'm looking forward to spring. Already the trees and flowers around my neck of the woods are in full bloom and the birds are nesting (in spite of all the rain). I heard a songbird outside my window just yesterday! I love the sound of songbirds (not chirping sparrows! LOL)

    I recently posted an article on the team about good verses bad calcium. I am happy to see that more and more health publications are printing the truth concerning calcium now. All that hype about Tums and taking any kind of calcium supplement is starting to cause problems with peoples health. It's important to get the right kind of calcium. I encourage you to investigate the calcium you are taking to make sure that you don't wind up with health issues from it.

    emoticon Dusty emoticon emoticon emoticon
    3846 days ago
  • v HONEYBEE56
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    Isn't it funny (not really) about how so many fast food industries in our country seem more concerned about making money than making people healthy? Sad isn't it?
    I just read this article:
    emoticon Potassium Bromate: This dough conditioner and bleaching agent, which was once widely used in bread baking, is considered a category 2B (possibly carcinogenic to humans) carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In 1993, the World Health Organization recommended its removal from all foods, and though it has been banned in many countries, it's still permitted in the United States and Japan, where it continues to be used in buns at Burger King, Arby's, and Wendy's, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest.
    Be careful where you eat and what you eat. emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon
    Just eat healthy and you will be much safer!
    emoticon Dusty emoticon emoticon emoticon

    3869 days ago

    Comment edited on: 2/16/2010 3:02:06 PM
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