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LOSINGSEVRYTHNG's Photo LOSINGSEVRYTHNG Posts: 116
7/23/19 3:02 P

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Sounds like you've been working on this for a while and are seeing some success! That's great! Keep up the good work!

Meanwhile, maybe try drinking V-8 or V-8 splash (or similar) while working on ways to get those veggies in there?

Look into complementary flavors (there are whole guides online about which herbs/spices best complement the flavors of various vegetables.) Sometimes that can be a real game changer.

Just echoing what other said: Try to eat a food at least 8 times over 8 or 9 days before you decide you really can't eat it. It takes time to learn to like something.

You don't have to like every vegetable. Eat from all the subgroups in order to get all the major nutrients, and it's even better if you eat a variety, but you don't have to eat every single vegetable.

Here are some online guides I found helpful:
How many servings of each category of vegetables should be ingested:
https://health.gov/DietaryGuidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter5.htm

What are the vegetable subgroups and what vegetables are in each subgroup?
https://www.isbe.net/Documents/vegetable-subgroups.pdf

And one more: https://www.precisionnutrition.com/dont-like-vegetables
or same info here: https://paleoleap.com/dont-like-vegetables/
(Just be aware there's a sales pitch at the end of both of these)

If there's a particular entire vegetable GROUP that you simply can't stand a single thing from, maybe look into powdered versions? But keep up the good work of trying to get used to eating fresh, since that's better for you in the long run. :)

You mentioned green beans (string beans) - as long as you are ok with other vegetables in the "other vegetables" subgroup, you should be ok. The nutrients from green beans can be found in lots of other foods.

Or you can try recipes that claim to make green beans edible: https://www.myfoodchannel.com/green-bean-recipe/




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LOSINGSEVRYTHNG's Photo LOSINGSEVRYTHNG Posts: 116
7/23/19 10:51 A

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Hi! I don't know what you've already tried... Maybe consider different cuisines? There's Asian, Mexican, Italian, Indian,...

Warning: Lots of delicious food is listed below. LOL

Ok, so here are a bunch of ideas; if you hate all of them except one, at least there might be one good one, right? :) So take a look...

For example, last night I stir-fried some cabbage, which is not a big fave, but when I added sesame seed oil it turned out really great.

I would consider that salsa, and spaghetti sauce, should count as vegetables.

Pico de gallo is a vegetable.

Pumpkin pie is a vegetable. (Ok, I'm ducking right now in case anyone wants to throw some rotten tomatoes *grin* ;) But seriously, you can add cooked pumpkin to some milk, add pumpkin pie spices, make a totally awesome smoothie that tastes like pumpkin pie.

Home-made zucchini bread contains zucchini, which is a vegetable.

There are lots of healthy ways to make spinach dip for your whole-wheat crackers. You can, for example, mix cooked spinach with sour cream and maybe a little chopped green onion or onion powder. Look online for "healthy spinach dip" for a whole bunch of ideas.

Add chopped veggies into an egg while scrambling it, top with shredded cheese. For example, one or two of the following: onion, green onion, green bell pepper, salsa, mushrooms (chop small), broccoli, asparagus. Top with shredded cheese or sour cream.

Add some mint leaves to your steamed peas (I had this once at a restaurant and it was amazing.)

Try adding coconut milk to cooked acorn squash.

Split pea soup is a vegetable (I think). So is tomato soup.

Try a plain baked or boiled sweet potato with nothing on it. (My mom always served it with brown sugar and marshmallows, but I tried one plain the other day, and Wow! I like it much better than chocolate!)

Or mash together sweet potato with regular potato.

Or julienne the sweet potato and make french fries out of it (bake in oven if you don't want to deep fry it).

Stir-fry greens like kale, spinach, chard, collard greens, and add a bunch of Old Bay or Canadian steak seasoning.

Make a burrito using a lettuce leaf instead of a tortilla. (Lettuce leaves can be used to wrap lots of foods. Another example would be pulled pork, or slow-cooked beef with cubes of baked potato, with some of the beef drippings).

Make spaghetti using spaghetti squash instead of noodles.

Add chopped veggies into lasagna (for example, zucchini). Or add chopped veggies into meatloaf or into hamburgers while forming. (Try diced mushroom, or diced green peppers, diced onion, ... I wouldn't do this with peas or string beans, but your mileage may vary!)

Guacamole is a vegetable. (It's avocado and sesame). [Edit: Sorry, not sesame. Lime, to keep the mashed avocado from turning brown. Hummus is garbanzo beans with sesame.]

Kimchee is a vegetable. (There are many!) (Most people think Kimchee is just cabbage, but there are other kinds that include things like radish, carrots, cucumber, mustard greens, and on and on.)

Put tomato and lettuce and onion on your hamburger.

Pickles, relish - these should also count as vegetables. And there are many vegetables that get pickled, not just cucumbers.

Popcorn is a vegetable. (I think.)

Chopped and steamed carrots are great with curry and butter. [Edit: curry powder. Corn is also great with curry powder and butter. I use frozen corn kernels.]

Carrots can also be added to soups or stew - they add a sweet flavor. Same with celery and turnips.

Or steam carrots until soft and mash together with potatoes for a nice mashed potato dish.

Cauliflower can also be cooked soft and mashed and added to either rice or mashed potatoes; in a small enough amount, you might not even notice it much.

As for string beans, have you ever tried three bean salad? It's really sweet, comes in a can, kind of like a pickle flavor, I think those include string beans.

Or - this one is a family tradition but you might not like it? - steam the string beans, cover with cream of mushroom soup (comes in a can) and fried onion (French's, for example) comes in a canister). You can look online for French's green bean casserole, it's basically that idea.

Hope some of these help.

Edited by: LOSINGSEVRYTHNG at: 7/23/2019 (11:04)

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ALUKOWSKY's Photo ALUKOWSKY SparkPoints: (19,802)
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7/16/19 1:35 P

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Try sauteeing them in a little bit of olive oil, pan-roasting them in the oven, or grilling them. If sauteeing, add some chopped garlic and onions; if roasting or grilling, sprinkle on a few simple spices such as a little powdered garlic and pepper. Avoid adding too much salt; try using Mrs. Dash instead.

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.


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CHRISSY182's Photo CHRISSY182 Posts: 103
7/16/19 12:06 P

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I am one who hates veggies. I have tried incorporating them in my meals by hiding them. I have a turkey ball recipe that I add in cauliflower rice and spinach as the binding agent. It is absolutely delicious. I started baking broccoli with garlic and adding a little cream sauce. It helps. I am one to grate the veggies in to sauces. I am 41 and this is he only way I will eat most veggies.



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GOLFGMA's Photo GOLFGMA Posts: 31,179
7/12/19 7:21 P

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I love vegetables and roasted or steamed are great!

Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit, but with humility of mind regard one another as more important than yourselves; do not merely look out for your own personal interests, but also for the interests of others. Phil 2:3-4.


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INTOTHENEW's Photo INTOTHENEW Posts: 722
7/12/19 6:45 P

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Becky was kind of a clean up on isle 3 sorta gal. We’ve lost that.

There is no bad food, only bad cooks.
INTOTHENEW's Photo INTOTHENEW Posts: 722
7/12/19 6:42 P

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Chinese Whispers are prevalent on this board.

There is no bad food, only bad cooks.
SLASALLE's Photo SLASALLE Posts: 16,941
7/12/19 3:49 P

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@URBANREDNEK

Thanks for your reply! Too bad that an article that appeared on SparkPeople doesn't have a source link that you consider to be reliable!! That's quite unusual from my experience with SparkPeople articles in the past. I've usually found that sources are well vetted.

That said, I actually prefer the whole food anyway because it does make me feel fuller than anything blended (or juiced). So it's not a problem for me. I will continue on as usual.

I agree that it looks like the subject matter needs more study!

Good luck!

Stephanie



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URBANREDNEK Posts: 11,934
7/12/19 3:35 P

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@SLASALLE

Thanks so much for the reply with the link!

I found the "source" linked in that article to be from a highly unreliable site, and that it did not provide reasonable evidence of the claim. Following the chain of references made it seem that the statement of decreased fibre was based on the fibre differences between fresh apples and applesauce - and that the source quoted doesn't understand that applesauce is the result of long cooking and not blending. Fibre changes (full breakdown of insoluble fibre and increase in soluble fibre) due to cooking are well documented, understood, and included in nutritional information - and only apply to blended fruits and vegetables if they are blended so long that they undergo some cooking due to the heat of the process.

Everything else that I have found indicates no change to overall amount of fibre in blended fruits and vegetables, with only minor changes to the insoluble fibre (equivalent to much chewing) that actually increases the availability of antioxidents and some vitamins from the food that are kept indigestible otherwise.

It looks like this is definitely an area that needs more official study, since there don't appear to be any figures available documenting tests done.

Until some actual data becomes available, I think that the best any of us can do is follow the example of the original poster and keep finding ways to include a wide variety of different plant foods --- so that we can enjoy a variety of preparations, including cooked or blended, knowing that we are overall getting in all of the nutrients (including fibre) that we need, regardless of what might be altered or lost in each individual choice.

Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

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LININPARADISE7's Photo LININPARADISE7 Posts: 1,117
7/12/19 2:44 P

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Steam them in the micro then sprinkle with shredded cheese of choice.
That's how I got my kids to eat veggies, now they like them with or without.

Live, Laugh, Love!!


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SHOAPIE's Photo SHOAPIE Posts: 31,847
7/11/19 8:22 P

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It’s all in how they are prepared. Don’t be afraid to try them in different ways. Always have a small amount of fat of some kind with your vegetables. Nutrients are absorbed better.

Edited by: SHOAPIE at: 7/11/2019 (20:23)

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PAMBROWN62's Photo PAMBROWN62 Posts: 16,947
7/11/19 7:41 P

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This used to be me. Because I felt I HAD to eat foods I didn’t like, veggies were always a problem.

However, this time around I resolved to eat only the vegetables I like to eat. Now, I don’t have any problem. I am willing to try new veggies, but if I don’t like them, I don’t eat them. So find veggies you do like or at least are willing to eat and make them the staple for getting in more veggies.

I still struggle with getting 5-7 a day but, thanks to only eating the ones I like, I am getting a solid 3 in every day. Still working on improving. Baby steps.

Edited by: PAMBROWN62 at: 7/11/2019 (22:38)
Being positive is a choice. My Mantra: “Every day may not be good, but there is something good in every day." Each morning seek the positive and you will have a good day. Always remember, “Your only competition is YOU.”

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USERSMYNAME Posts: 167
7/11/19 7:39 P

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last night I made a huge pot of beef & turkey chili. In a little food processor, I chopped until fine one gigantic zucchini and about a cup of broccoli & cauliflower. It ended up being almost three cereal bowl-sized portions. I added this to the pot as the last ingredient(s) and let it all simmer for the usual 40+ minutes. I cannot taste the veg at all.

FLORADITA SparkPoints: (74,275)
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7/11/19 5:51 P

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I hated veggies as a child because all I knew were over cooked mushy carrots, broccoli or horrible things from a can. (think wax beans...shudder) Once I was older and dining in nice restaurants I was surprised how good the vegetables were. It is all in how they are cooked, overcooked not good, lightly sautéed with garlic and olive oil can be amazing. I now I eat a mostly vegetable diet (fish and eggs are included in my diet). To me eating meat is boring, lots of chewing with bland flavour, kind of makes me gag. To each their own but you might want to ask friends for their favorite veggie recipes and experiment.

"It's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." - Abe Lincoln


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INTOTHENEW's Photo INTOTHENEW Posts: 722
7/11/19 5:12 P

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“Lustig sent me to this 2009 paper by Penn State researchers. The study, it turns out, doesn’t directly bear on Lustig’s claim that pureeing fruit destroys insoluble fiber.”


LOL

There is no bad food, only bad cooks.
SLASALLE's Photo SLASALLE Posts: 16,941
7/11/19 4:30 P

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SparkPeople article is from April 2017. Second paragraph under smoothie bowls discusses how blending breaks down the fiber and quotes a registered dietician nutritionist.

Hope this helps. It certainly explains why I feel fuller when I eat a whole fruit or vegetable versus drinking it ...

www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_art
icles.asp?id=2244


Edited by: SLASALLE at: 7/11/2019 (16:37)

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URBANREDNEK Posts: 11,934
7/11/19 4:05 P

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@SLASALLE

"In the midst of this discussion, it should probably be noted that when veggies (and fruits) are put in a blender, the fiber benefits are pretty much done away with. "

Would you happen to have a source for this? It has been a while since I researched this, so maybe the source that you found is more current and has some different results.

I am a bit fanatical about fibre in my foods, and have only found sources advising that blending does not impact fibre content in any way, since it does not remove anything. My understanding of the information that I've seen is that the blender just replaces the teeth and chewing in changing the texture of the original foods.

Blending in to "smoothies" has always been recommended for retaining all of the fibre and associated benefits, as opposed to "juicing" which does totally remove all of the insoluble and most of the soluble fibre.

Extended blending can add heat to the food, and so can impact heat sensitive vitamin content, but neither soluble nor insoluble fibre is heat sensitive.

Here are a few random articles that I just found:

www.nutritioned.org/juicing-vs-blending.ht
ml


www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/03
/smoothie-logic/518127/


www.livestrong.com/article/548978-does-fru
it-lose-its-nutritional-value-when-its
-blended/


Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

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SLASALLE's Photo SLASALLE Posts: 16,941
7/11/19 2:48 P

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In the midst of this discussion, it should probably be noted that when veggies (and fruits) are put in a blender, the fiber benefits are pretty much done away with.



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KENGELEN's Photo KENGELEN Posts: 25
7/6/19 9:37 A

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Thank you so much!! I'm not afraid to try new things, just typically I don't like them. I have always wondered if it has more to do with how it was cooked, but I don't have a good recipe file on vegetables. I love your suggestions for zucchini! Again, thank you for taking the time to help me!



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MIAMIRN's Photo MIAMIRN Posts: 2,666
7/6/19 1:41 A

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emoticon

Being a picky eater is part physiology and part learned behavior. You can’t change your taste buds, but you can change how you perceive taste.

I was a picky eater as a child, my mom did not say a word to me, but still served me what was on the menu. Through the years, I tasted food I disliked again and again. Because, i did that I became more accustomed to the flavor, texture and smell. Today, I am not a picky eater and I am willing to try new and sometimes foreign food. Example: two years ago I tried squid in it’s black ink. I thought it was disgusting! Lol i just tried it a week ago and i thought it was tolerable. At least it wasn’t repulsive! Lol. Next time, maybe I’ll like it a little more. My point is, if you want to eat a food, for whatever reason, it’s important to have an open mind about it. It’s important for you to be open minded and genuinly want to like it.

My grandson has very high functioning Autism. One of the symptoms is a heightened sensory system. My grandson is a perfect example of a picky eater. He started out picky as a baby, but by two was eating mostly everything. At age 8 he moved away from grandma’s house. Slowly, he became a picky eater and remains so, until this day. He is now 17 and has a really hard time liking vegetables. He knows vegetables are very important so he really tries to eat them. He falls short of his nutritional requirements and supplements them with vitamins.

One day I asked him why he didn’t like lettuce. He explained he didn’t like the crunchy sound he heard when chewing. This got me thinking about another way people perceive food.

What do you not like about vegetables?

Maybe through changing the way they are prepared, changing your behavior and view of them, and exposing yourself to trying them more and more you might be able to eat your nutritional requirement vegetables.

Good luck!

emoticon emoticon



My name is Elona. I live in the Philippines.
Love life! Never, never give up! Never give in, never give in, never; never; never; never give in nothing, great or small, large or petty. Never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense-Winston Churchill. When you have a lemon, make lemonade!


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INTOTHENEW's Photo INTOTHENEW Posts: 722
7/5/19 5:52 P

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Vegetables, and certainly fruit, will taste incredible when you remove processed food from your diet, and control the salt and sugar that you consume otherwise.

Your palate can change.

What is your favorite food/dish?

There is no bad food, only bad cooks.
MARTHA324's Photo MARTHA324 Posts: 9,503
7/4/19 9:02 P

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The best way I know (and I loved most veggies) is to use them in soups and stews. You can puree them and that sort of blends it all together. And fruit is good too...start with one veggie you like and start to add to it.

You can also top a veggie with a little melted cheese or hot sauce. Spaghetti sauce is a good way to add veggies (puree them too) to your meal.

Persistence is more important than perfection.

Don't assume your freedoms are assured.

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NIRERIN Posts: 14,678
7/4/19 4:05 P

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Vegetables span a pretty broad range of flavors and textures. Green beans are nothing like corn, and both are very different from potatoes and chard is another beast entirely. And there are tons more vegetables out there.

I have been a picky eater for most of my life. As a picky eater I need to keep trying things that I don't like more than other people. It's certainly fine to call some foods off limits (hello cottage cheese) for good, but a lot of others need more trial and error. That being said, worker smarter on your trial and error. Don't get a pound of five new vegetables every week. Get a new vegetable each week. Don't use up that vegetable in one go. If you get a zucchini this week, use it in four different preparations. It is a little more work until you learn about yourself and preferences, but it also doesn't create as much waste and lets you have a bite or two of something new without having to have a whole pot of it. Have a cup of something to choke down isn't fun and isn't going to help you like something that you don't. Having a few bites is doable and will help you learn what you like and how you like it. Again, a lot of variety in vegetables to be dumping them all in the nasty category.

Back to our zucchini for the week. Cut a quarter off and do one of the following preparations (or insert your own suggestion):
-slice thinly, lightly coat with olive oil, season and bake, turning once. You have zucchini chips
-grate and stir into a pasta dish
-grate and stir into a red sauce
-cut/slice into your favorite noodle shape and have with the sauce of your choice
- hollow out, bake, cook the middle up with some potato and make a twice baked zucchini with potato. Alternately, add some salsa and chicken or pulled pork or whatever protein you'd like into the cavity.
- slice into rounds, lightly coat in cheese, and bake or crisp up in a pan
- pickle
-add to a salad
-slice into wedges and make zucchini fries
-cut then sautee with olive oil and garlic

Once you have made a preparation, make notes of what you did or did not like. As in get a notebook, write zucchini on a page and put your preparation on the first line. Then write down if you had an issue with the flavor, the texture or whatever. Note the things that you did like as well. You might find that you like things sauteed in olive oil with garlic, or that you like things roasted, or that you absolutely hate the texture of certain things raw. Knowing these things can help you pick preparations that you are more likely to like. Once you have used up your four preps for zucchini this week, move on to the next vegetable on the next page next week. Having zucchini eighty times in a row isn't going to make you like it any more. Having zucchini this week, then trying out brussels sprouts next week (yes, boiled may be yucky, but have you tried shredding them and adding to lo mein or spring rolls? what about roasting with apple cider vinegar and bacon?) lets you work your way through a host of vegetables without getting bogged down on one. When you can't find any more vegetables to try then you move back to zucchini for four new preparations.

Odds are there are some preps that you'll like a little more than others (roasting then serving on a sub roll with melted cheese or making chips out of) and when you find something you like, rotate in that new option and try other vegetables with the same preparation. You may also find that boiling until grey doesn't make vegetables more appetizing. Pick what you like more and avoid the things that aren't working. If you like crisp, pickle things or make them into chips. If you like softer things, grate them or sautee them. If you like corn, consider shredding zucchini, onions, peppers, tomatoes, greens or other things, lightly sauteeing and then adding the corn to minimize the textures of what you don't like while keeping the flavor and texture of what you do like. If you like potatoes, you can toss a lot of things into potato soup or twice baked potatoes. Root vegetables are pretty sweet once roasted and you can do one beet, one parsnip, three carrots and four potatoes to increase the variety while still having a lot of what you like.

Finally, if you can manage eating the rainbow of fruit and you like it and it works for you, eat the rainbow of fruit and go lower on the vegetables.

-google first. ask questions later.

URBANREDNEK Posts: 11,934
7/4/19 2:38 P

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The most important thing is for you to take the time to honestly assess what it is that you really disliked about the veggies that you have had in the past. You need to determine whether it was flavour, or texture, or aroma that bothered you - which will tell you what you need to have different in order to find choices that you enjoy.

Many of us learned to loathe over-cooked boiled vegetables as kids - since the texture (oddly chewy mush) was grotesque, the odour was not appealing at all, and quite often the flavour was some kind of oddly bitter / sour / bland. Quite often, our families only had access to canned veggies for much of the year, so trying to have us eat healthy veggies was a bit of a losing battle.

If that is what you still have in your head, then just trying different preparations (roasting is wonderful - a bit of olive oil, a sprinkle of salt and spices, and roast to your preferred texture) might be all that you need. Otherwise, there are lots of suggestions in this article that you might find helpful: www.sparkpeople.com/blog/blog.asp?post=59_
creative_ways_to_sneak_some_veggies_in
to_your_diet


You could always blend them and have in a smoothie, or baked in to something (a few "anti-veg" folks in my clan love this one: recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?
recipe=3364156
), or blend some in to a sauce either with or without other veggies (like this: recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?
recipe=3374316
).

I love getting ideas for new vegetables / preparations from vegetarian / vegan sites - even though I usually have them with an animal protein. One site that has some great ideas is here: ohsheglows.com/categories/recipes-2/food-e
ntrees/entree-chili-stew/


Kudos on recognizing your dislike as something that can be worked on / worked around - and taking positive steps to do so! Hopefully some of the suggestions here can be useful for you.

Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

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LOTUS737's Photo LOTUS737 Posts: 6,310
7/4/19 11:29 A

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Blend/grate them into things. Easy to hide in sauces, smoothies, soups, meatballs/burgers, quick breads, etc. Or smother them in sauces/add cheese/etc.

Aside from that I would recommend trying to prepare them in different ways. I personally haven't really met a boiled veggie I've enjoyed, but I love them roasted or grilled. And pair them with things you already like. For example, if you like sweet potato, try making a hash and adding some spinach or kale to it- the sweetness will help balance the bitterness in the greens. Or if you enjoy corn, try making little veggie cutlets with corn, potato, and maybe some bell pepper or spinach!

In general if it's bitterness you don't like, start off with sweeter veg like corn, tomatoes, red bell peppers, carrots, sugar snap peas, etc. Then if you're so inclined you can start to expand to more... vegetal options by trying the pairing suggestion.

Healthy choices and actions have positive impacts, even if the scale doesn't move!


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KENGELEN's Photo KENGELEN Posts: 25
7/4/19 10:03 A

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I hate most vegetables. I have since childhood and I am now 45. I seriously can't figure out why anyone thinks a green bean tastes good. I have gotten some better. I love lettuce now. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to get more veggies in my diet without them really tasting like veggies?



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