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MINDFUL-C's Photo MINDFUL-C SparkPoints: (182,007)
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6/18/19 8:29 A

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Leaving this journal for a bit.

For now I have a journal here:

sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_message
bo
ard_thread.asp?board=-1x64153x71394488


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 6/18/2019 (09:30)
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6/12/19 1:10 P

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Exercising does not mean I get to eat and eat.

C

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6/11/19 4:23 A

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Renew your vision


Always hold a vision of the outcome you want. Imagine having more energy, moving easier and enjoying better health. Picture easily sliding into an airline seat or getting up off the floor from playing with your kids or grandkids. Let these images sustain you, even during times when you take a break to rest and recover.

Today

• Create a vision

I want to lose the 10 I regained and lose a little more so my body is healthier. My body deserves to carry less weight. I want to mentally feel better too.

C

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6/10/19 4:05 A

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So what is my plan?

C

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6/6/19 3:59 A

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I am healthier now at 50 than I was in my 40's. The scale says I am over weight (by 2 lbs) but I have been running almost every day.

My belly looks big but the rest of me looks healthier.

Working on it.

Not making consistent healthier food choices. Why?

"Take charge of your own life, including your eating and exercise. No one is going to make you follow a healthy eating or exercise plan, so it’s up to you to manage these areas of life. "

100 More Days

Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 6/6/2019 (04:01)
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6/5/19 4:18 A

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Let myself feel.

Love me.

Be proud of me.

I often feel guilty, ashamed, scared, upset.

I fear change, the unknown, things I can not control.

Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 6/5/2019 (04:20)
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5/25/19 6:32 P

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I need to figure myself out. I am spending too much of my life thinking about food and diets. I know what I need to do to live.


I can't let go of my diet related emotions.... At least not yet


If you want to be healthy about your emotions, you can’t run from them. Instead, you have to be willing to sit with them and actually feel them. Sometimes this takes a lot of courage. But it’s the key to healing the pain and letting go of using food to keep it buried.

Today

• Describe a life issue where you avoid feeling emotion because it’s painful.
• Use the exercise “I feel, because of” to label the feelings associated with this.
• Sit with the emotions and allow yourself to feel them and heal from them. Write about this experience.


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 6/5/2019 (04:19)
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5/24/19 4:08 A

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5/24 Day 60 The gift of yourself


Consider letting go of fretting about yourself and your own weight-loss goals. Instead, focus on your ability to support and encourage others. Think about the words you need to hear, then give these words away to someone else.

Today

• Find people who are trying to lose weight. Encourage them and tell them you know they can be successful. Describe their reactions.
• Send out five “I’m thinking of you” cards or “You can do it” emails.
• Record your thoughts about how it felt to share the gift of yourself.

I can only do that here as I try not to discuss weight loss with others as I just try to live and not focus on diet.



C

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5/23/19 4:02 A

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When there isn’t enough

There are a lot of times in life when you simply can’t get enough. During these times, remember that food won’t fix your empty heart. Instead, you have to identify what you need, then take care of those needs through nurturing and self-care activities.

Today

• Identify a recent time when you couldn’t get enough of something you needed.


• Write a list of specific needs related to that time or event.


• Write a plan for how you can take care of your needs when there isn’t enough.
--------------------
Today I am working on knowing when my body has had enough. I will revisit this lesson at a later date.


C

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5/22/19 4:15 A

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Thank you Ski

Grieve your progress

Grieving what you’ve left behind is a healthy part of moving forward in life. Whether you lose a bunch of weight or go through challenging times, go ahead and grieve your progress. It’s a healthy part of moving forward in life. Then find ways to replace the past and every day take steps in your new life.

Today

• Identify a life change or event that caused you to grieve your progress.
• Make a list of the losses or things you left behind with this event.
• Now create a list of ways you can replace those things in healthy ways.

I am not ready for this lesson right now.


C

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SKIRUNNER1's Photo SKIRUNNER1 Posts: 2,216
5/21/19 1:29 P

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C! Good insights! emoticon



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5/21/19 4:04 A

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5/21
Day 57 People make me eat

When we want to connect with people, food becomes the string that pulls us together. Sometimes your efforts to connect don’t even work. Heading to the refrigerator might seem like a good solution, but food can’t make up for the absence of good companionship or meaningful conversation.

Sometimes when I know I have to meet people I eat due to anxiety and worry.

Today

Identify situations where you eat to please someone or because it’s expected.

Celebrations, when someone makes something for me (without being asked to), when we go out to eat (luckily that is not often)

• Write a statement that describes how you will avoid giving away your power by eating to please others.

I may not be able to control life, and other's actions, but I can control me. I have the power over me.

• Create a plan for managing the situations where you eat to please someone. Put it in place today.

So I read something interesting last night. I read a bit more of the IE book, about data on nutrition and some of the pushes for certain foods... did not find it very interesting. But then I read in a different book about the need for control. Yes, that is ME I stress about everything because I can't control it. But I can control my food. That is why I binge and sneak eat. I can control it, even when I think I can't. Diets are a form of control. Me eating the chocolate or not eating the chocolate is a form of control, but self control. I decide. I like that feeling of having control.

I can not control my scale. I can not control if people bring food.

I do need to feel like I am in charge of me. Just control, not power (to influence others), just the illusion that I want the power. My sneak eating is my secret, my illusion of power.

I have a hard time doing things without constantly thinking about my flaws. I am negative focusing on my mistakes.

But the sneak eating binges becomes who I am, so in that way I lose control. I control my hands but there is something inside me that I often feel I can not control, which is telling me I need to have the junk food. I had the illusion of power... but I don't really have it yet.




Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/21/2019 (04:26)
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5/20/19 4:23 A

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5/20
Day 56 I'm so bored

Any time you are feeling bored, take a few minutes to determine what’s prompting your thoughts. Then use solutions that match your specific needs instead of eating because you are bored.

Today

• Create a challenge list to use next time you feel bored. Include things that will give you meaning or deepen your knowledge and skills.

Read, type, play, rest

• Do at least one of the things on your list today.

• Record how that worked and whether it helped you avoid food temptations.

After work and evenings are my rough times.


C

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5/17/19 4:06 A

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Day 55 Food as reward

In our busy, chaotic lives, we sometimes want a break from all of our demands and responsibilities. When we eat, we tell our hectic thoughts, “Here’s a small reward. It will help you get through the rest of your day.” But rewarding yourself with food results in a hollow victory. In reality, you would much rather be noticed by the people you worked so hard to please.

Today

• Create a list of non-food rewards. At least once today, reward yourself with something from your list.

Read a book with a cup of tea or coffee
Go for a run or use my weights
Just take a deep breath and tell me how I love me! :)

• Give rewards such as hugs, cards or appreciation to others. Record your actions.

While I have a tendency to look at the negative, I always thank people and praise them for help, their attention, their love. At work I do it in person or in an email.

Not really a card person.


C

Live in the moment

I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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5/16/19 4:07 A

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Day 54: Please comfort me

Even if you’ve been an emotional eater for years, you aren't stuck with these negative patterns. Start by realizing the key to managing your weight begins with healing your heart, not filling your spoon. As you discover new ways to cope with your emotional needs, you’ll move toward a sense of peace with food—a feeling you may have forgotten existed.

I REALLY need this. I was honest with my husband (again) last night. I let him know my weight is up a little and that I have been emotionally eating, sneak eating. He suggested throwing out food. Why does it hurt to do that?

Today

• Recall a recent time when food helped you feel comforted or secure. Describe it.
Honestly I though it did, but afterwards I always feel guilt.


• Come up with at least two or three things you could have done instead of eating.

Talk, read, exercise, rest, type / write, play bass

• Write a plan about how you’ll use one of those items the next time you need comfort.


C

Live in the moment

I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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 Pounds lost: 20.2 
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5/15/19 4:07 A

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Day 53: Taking care of needs

As much as you wish someone else would fix your life, ultimately you have to do it yourself. Even if you believe that someone else should do more for you, other people can never fill all the gaps in your life. It’s up to you to figure out how to get your needs met.

Today

• When you wake up each morning, ask yourself “What do I need today?” Record several things.

I need to choose to take care of ME!

• For each item, write an answer to the question, “How can I get it?”

Making healthier food choices more often
Moving my body with exercise

• Choose one need, then make an action plan for working on it today.

Today is an off day for running. I plan to use my hand weights for a bit. I had stopped using them.


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/15/2019 (04:07)
C

Live in the moment

I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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 Pounds lost: 20.2 
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MINDFUL-C's Photo MINDFUL-C SparkPoints: (182,007)
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5/14/19 4:02 A

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5/14 The food fix

As you work on identifying your needs, don’t get stuck by saying, “I can’t do anything about that!” Right now, your task is to figure out exactly what is contributing to your emotional eating. You won’t be able to fix all of these needs right away, but knowing what they are will help you recognize where to start making changes.

Today

• Look back at the list of needs you made yesterday. Now add a list of deeper needs such as better self-esteem or more motivation.
More self esteem
No longer sneak eat
Feed my body healthier food (I did OK with this yesterday)

• For each of these deeper needs, note the times when you use food to fix them.
• Choose one of those needs and create an action plan for taking care of it without food.

Food does nothing good. It can add weight (if it is fatty, salty, or too sweet), and make me feel guilty.

Just be me.


C

Live in the moment

I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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 Pounds lost: 20.2 
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MINDFUL-C's Photo MINDFUL-C SparkPoints: (182,007)
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5/13/19 4:16 A

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5/13 Emotional Needs

We all have needs in our lives. But to deal with them in ways that don’t involve food, you need to become skilled at knowing what you are trying to fix. As you know from figuring out what you feel, labeling gives you power. So while identifying what you need won’t always stop you from emotional eating, at least it will help you see the connection of how food takes care of you.

Today

• Write the words, “What do I need?”

What do I need?
I need to feel good about my choices
I need to take care of me

Then make a list of your needs. Keep asking the question, “What else do I need?”

What else do I need?
Worry less over the kids
Worry less over all
I need to stop sneak eating



• Choose one thing from your list and do something today that will help take care of that need.


C

Live in the moment

I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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5/12/19 5:50 A

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Thank you!

I am sore today. Different that treadmill sore. Running outside is different that the treadmill, and I knew it would be.

While I like my safe place LOL, I will run outside again. Who knows, maybe I will do it by myself.

Today I will use the treadmill and complete the week's workouts in the course (there are 5).

Tomorrow I will start week 4 again. I always complete the week 2x before moving on to the next. Helps keep it doable. Loving this iFit program. I am running for health, not weight loss. I am keeping it doable and positive.

I had salt yesterday and I know I am having ice cream today. Feeling mentally positive even though the scale is up. The scale is only one tool.



Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/12/2019 (05:53)
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SKIRUNNER1's Photo SKIRUNNER1 Posts: 2,216
5/11/19 6:20 P

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Awesome!!



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5/11/19 6:30 A

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5/11

I am going to run outside today. Yep.

That is HUGE for me. I have major anxiety issues. I worry about almost everything to a point I feel physical pain.

I have been training on my treadmill since the beginning of March using a learn to run program with iFit. Yesterday I ran 2X for 12 minutes at 4.8 mph.

My husband is a runner and will run with me.

I hope to run most of a Father's Day 5K (3.14 miles).

Update: I ran for 13 minutes (around a 4.7 mph pace) then walked / ran the rest for 3.15 miles! Yessss! I have a wonderful supportive husband.


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/11/2019 (10:03)
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Live in the moment

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5/10/19 4:08 A

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5/10 Empty bucket

Emotional energy is essential to living in a healthy and balanced way. By taking care of your emotional bucket at intervals, you’ll prevent it from getting so low you feel drained and empty. Each day, plan a few things that will fill your level of emotional energy back up, even just a little.

.....think about what fuels you and helps you feel more positive.

Today

• Write a list of things that drain your emotional energy.

Chores, work, bills (and how some services are getting more and more expensive), things left around the house, eating when not hungry, eating very unhealthy foods, driving, busy schedules, illness, loss of loved ones, thinking about what others are thinking of me.

• Write a second list of things that build your emotional energy back up.

Deep breaths, finishing a 5K workout, sitting with coffee and reading, playing bass, hugs from my kids or husband, getting paid, petting my dog, working on not caring what others think and just doing it!

• Evaluate the current level of your emotional bucket and plan ways to improve it daily.

Bucket is not a a great level but I am working on it.


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/11/2019 (06:16)
C

Live in the moment

I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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 Pounds lost: 20.2 
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5/9/19 4:14 A

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5/9 Laugh away stress

Set up a play date for yourself, just like parents do for their children. Your play date can be done alone or with other people. Think about what would make you laugh, then plan something that will be fun and entertaining.

My "Play Date" is band practice. I usually have a small glass of wine and hang and play. My husband, daughter, and 2 other friends are in our "basement band". I plan electric bass. It is a great stress release.

Today

• Create a plan for a play date for yourself, either alone or with another person.

So other than band I need more play dates with myself. It will help me feel better and also keep me from focusing on food.

My treadmill time, while it can be challenging, also keeps me busy and I try to focus on the positive when working out. So that is sort of my play time too.

I also love to read. In addition to my fiction books (in about 5 series) I am reading "Intuitive Eating" and looking into "Shatter the Yoyo"


• Set a day and time for your play date and write down what you will do.

• Afterward, describe your play date and how it helped you relax, laugh and have fun.


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/9/2019 (17:15)
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Live in the moment

I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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 Pounds lost: 20.2 
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5/8/19 4:15 A

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5/8/19 Stress is not life

Think about what would happen if you broke your leg. Imagine all the places you’d suddenly have to make changes or eliminate responsibilities. Now pick out a few of those demands and, using the broken leg approach, decide which activities are critical to keep and which ones you can let go.

(What a wonderful lesson. This one really "hit" me.)

Today

• Identify one area in life that tempts you to eat in response to stress.

(Fear of / or hearing criticism. I sneak eat sugar and other carbs.)

• Describe how you will cope with this this area differently due to your “broken leg.”

(I can choose to eat what I want when I want. If I sneak eat or eat poorly often I am not sneaking as I gain weight and feel mentally worse (like now).)

• Record ways your new plan helped you manage your stress without eating.

(I want to let go of the stress when I feel it. I want to have a healthier mind and body.)


C

Live in the moment

I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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 Pounds lost: 20.2 
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5/7/19 4:07 A

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5/7/19 Food replaces love

With holidays or birthdays, it doesn’t matter how strongly you believe someone should call, visit or be nice to you. Instead of waiting for someone to show you love, try turning the tables and giving it out. Remember that you hold the power for your own nurturing and you don’t have to use food to replace love.

Today

• Identify a holiday, birthday or event where you wait for someone to care about you.

• Plan ways you can show extra love and attention to others during this time.

• Notice how it changes your desire to eat in order to cope. Record your response.

I will try to remember this lesson as I tend to get disappointed easily. I do not want the attention, but then when I do not receive it I feel disappointment and that often leads to sneak eating.

"If I wasn't thinking/worrying about food, what would I be thinking/worrying about?"


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/7/2019 (04:42)
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5/5/19 1:18 P

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I have been lost. Perfect lesson for today:

Disappointment:

Whenever you feel disappointed because something didn’t go the way you wanted, look for the trade-off you got instead. Maybe you learned or experienced something new. Perhaps a different opportunity or item showed up instead of the one you wanted so badly. Instead of letting a disappointment pull you into despair, search for the trade-offs and give yourself a new perspective.

Today

• Write down a recent disappointment. It can be a small one or a larger, life disappointment.

I have gained weight again. Not giving numbers. (I am still OK, but barely)
I am sneak eating a lot
I feel out of control with food.
I am depressed because of the above
I have my usual anxiety and this feeds the cycle. I know they are just thoughts but the thoughts are there.

• Record your initial response, including whether it made you want to eat something.

I am drinking coffee so I am not hungry.

• Look for a “trade-off” or what you got instead. Describe this in detail.

I did not get anything positive other than I realize I feel lost.

---------------------
6 Ingredient Cheat Sheet

1. Mr. Clean: Evaluate your situation and do a big “CLEANSE”. Clean up all parts of your life/area that are holding you back from attracting what you want into your life. Be sure to look at your closets and pantries, too! (You never know where those cobwebs are!)

2. Pick Your Favorite: Pick one thing that you can achieve this right away and stick with it. It doesn’t have to be the most difficult or even the most important one. One success will lead to other successes! The one you choose has to be valuable that at the end you say “YES, I DID IT!”

3. Name It: Name the one goal that you want to achieve. Give it an acronym. Describe it in detail. What does it look like? Does it make you feel happy inside? How do you feel when you reach it? By describing it, it makes the goal become more real and achievable. It takes the scariness out of reaching your goals.

4. Brand-Spanking New: Pick something new that you have always wanted to do in your life. By stepping out and trying new things, it will help leave those dirty, nasty habits in the dust. New habits create more fun and possibilities for you, and it will create more confidence.

5. MINE: Own IT! All the hard work and successes that you have achieved in life, own them. You did them. It is okay to be proud of who and what you are. Never shy away from showing your awesomeness. By claiming who you are, it makes more room to become even better versions of us in our lives. Don’t be afraid! Scream to the world that you are A-MAY-ZEENG!

6. R.A.K: Pay it forward with an random act of kindness. If one ever wants to create more goodness in the world, it can be done with kindness. Know someone that needs a little boost? Be it for them. Know someone down in the dumps? Give them your smile. Know someone that is struggling with their goals, too? Share your new insights with them. Any time we give to others, it helps build ourselves. What greater way can we leave this world a better place for others than by spreading some cheer and happiness?


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/6/2019 (04:36)
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5/4/19 11:16 A

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What is my plan?

Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/6/2019 (04:20)
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5/4/19 6:08 A

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5/4

How to Stop Worrying About What Other People Think of You

If you want to be your best and perform at a high level, fear of people’s opinions may be holding you back.

Think about a time when you were extremely anxious — say, before standing up to publicly speak, raising your hand in a big meeting, or even walking through a room of strangers. The reason you felt small and scared and tense is you were worried about social disapproval.

Our fear of other people’s opinions, or FOPO as I call it, has become an irrational and unproductive obsession in the modern world, and its negative effects reach far beyond performance.

If you start paying less and less attention to what makes you you — your talents, beliefs, and values — and start conforming to what others may or may not think, you’ll harm your potential. You’ll start playing it safe because you’re afraid of what will happen on the other side of the critique. You’ll fear being ridiculed or rejected. When challenged, you’ll surrender your viewpoint. You won’t raise your hand when you can’t control the outcome. You won’t go for that promotion because you won’t think you’re qualified.

Unfortunately, FOPO is part of the human condition since we’re operating with an ancient brain. A craving for social approval made our ancestors cautious and savvy; thousands of years ago, if the responsibility for the failed hunt fell on your shoulders, your place in the tribe could be threatened. The desire to fit in and the paralyzing fear of being disliked undermine our ability to pursue the lives we want to create.

This underscores why we need to train and condition our mind — so the tail is not wagging the dog.

If you find yourself experiencing FOPO, there are ways to dampen the intensity of your stress responses. Once you’re aware of your thoughts, guide yourself toward confidence-building statements (I am a good public speaker, I’ve put in the work so that I can trust my abilities, I have a lot of great things to say, I’m completely prepared for this promotion). These statements will help you focus on your skills and abilities rather than others’ opinions. Take deep breaths, too. This will signal to your brain that you’re not in immediate danger.

But, if you really want to conquer FOPO, you’ll need to cultivate more self-awareness. Most of us go through life with a general sense of who we are, and, in a lot of circumstances, that’s enough. We get by. But if you want to be your best while being less fearful of people’s opinions, you need to develop a stronger and much deeper sense of who you are.

You can start by developing a personal philosophy — a word or phrase that expresses your basic beliefs and values. The personal philosophy of Pete Carroll, my business partner and head coach of the Seattle Seahawks, is “always compete.” For Coach Carroll, always competing means spending every day working hard to get better and reach his fullest potential. This philosophy isn’t a platitude or slogan; rather, it’s his compass, guiding his actions, thoughts, and decisions. As a coach. A father. A friend. In every area of life.

When coming up with a personal philosophy, ask yourself a series of questions:

When I’m at my best, what beliefs lie just beneath the surface of my thoughts and actions?

Who are people that demonstrate characteristics and qualities that are in alignment with mine?

What are those qualities?
What are your favorite quotes? Your favorite words?

Once you’ve answered these questions, circle the words that stand out to you and cross out the ones that don’t. After studying what’s left, try to come up with a phrase or sentence that lines up with exactly who you are and how you want to live your life. Share the draft with a loved one, ask for input, and fine-tune your philosophy from there. Then commit it to memory and return to it daily.

Crafting a personal philosophy can be an eye-opening and powerful exercise. When I coach teams of executives, I often ask them to write down their personal philosophy and share it with the group. I’ll never forget the time a senior executive wowed everyone in the room. As tears welled up in his eyes, he straightened his back, held his head high, and said, “My philosophy is to walk worthy.” He told his colleagues that his parents were immigrants who had persevered through challenging circumstances to ensure he had better opportunities. Because of his parents’ hard work and sacrifice, he considered it his duty to live life as if his family crest were emblazoned across his chest. Every day, he tries to be worthy of their good deeds, and to be a great role model for the next generation.

I can’t overstate how important a personal philosophy is. Working with NFL players and coaches, extreme-sport athletes, and senior leaders at Fortune 50 companies, I’ve noticed that, beyond a relentless pursuit of being their best, what makes these high performers great is their clear sense of the principles that guide them. Because of their clarity, they’re more willing to push themselves, learn more, and embrace discomfort. They can shut out the noise and opinions of fans and media and listen to their own well-calibrated, internal compass.

Once you’ve developed your own personal philosophy, commit yourself to live in accordance with its tenets. Start at home. Tell that person you love them. Dance at a wedding. Take risks. Be respectfully weird. (That probably means, be you.) Then try it at work. Give a presentation. Go for that promotion. Do things that will engender the opinions of others. When you feel the power of FOPO holding you back, simply acknowledge it, and re-connect to your philosophy and the larger objective at hand.

Moving forward, solicit feedback from a short list of people who matter to you. Honest reflection is a vital component of mastery. During an episode of my podcast, “Finding Mastery,” Brené Brown, a renowned researcher and author of Dare to Lead, suggested that the names of those people should fit on a 1×1 inch index card. I add a second condition. The people on your card should have a great sense of the person you are and the person you’re working to become. Hold their views in high regard, letting the noise from the crowd fade away. Calibrate their feedback with your experience.

Most of all, remember that growth and learning take place when you’re operating at the edge of your capacity. Like blowing up a nearly inflated balloon, living in accordance with your personal philosophy will require more effort and power, but, the result, which is to authentically and artistically express who you are, will push you to live and work with more purpose and meaning.

hbr.org/2019/05/how-to-stop-worrying
-a
bout-what-other-people-think-of-you?R>utm_source=pocket-newtab


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5/3/19 4:15 A

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5/3 Day 45 Safe places

Whenever you're going through a major change in life, emotional safety is especially important. Any time you start a new job or move to a different home, don’t wait for months to “fix things up.” Take immediate steps to make yourself feel comfortable and emotionally safe, even in a brand-new setting.

Today

• Write a plan for creating a safe place.

This is a tough one for me because I use food often. And even though we are supposed to support ourselves, love ourselves I have been angry with myself. I have been binging on chocolate and sneak eating. I say I will stop and then I do it again. Now the scale is up a little and I said I would stay at my lower weight. I am not out of control but the roller coaster is hurting me mentally and physically.

My positive mind set SHOULD be my safe place.


• Set up and personalize the area. Describe what’s in your safe place and how it looks.

My journal at my computer is my safe place.


• Spend at least ten minutes in your safe place today. Write about what you did and how it felt.

I usually do this after work, but that is also usually when I start (if it happens) the chocolate binge.


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5/2/19 4:07 A

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5/2 Food tracing


When emotional needs arise, vague food memories may actually drive you to seek relief you found with those foods in the past. You may be surprised at what pops to mind when you look for the memories that hook you with your favorite food. Food tracing will often reveal thoughts of better days when your needs for comfort, nurturing and happiness were met.

Today

• Choose a favorite food and write down times when you seem to crave it a lot.

Cookies, chocolate, ice cream, bread (very often I crave all but the chocolate is easy to sneak so I have been eating it a lot.)

• Close your eyes and mentally track backward to your earliest memories of eating this food. Describe the scene, then add the emotions you were feeling at that time.

My mom used to buy us a chocolate bar to share. We would eat it before we got home so we did not have to share with Dad and Brother.

• Connect those emotions or needs to present times when you crave this food. Record your insights as well as some non-food ways to take care of these needs.

I want to just eat. I don't want to have to think. I just want it! But I want to be a healthy weight, and have a healthier body too. I don't want others to see me eating unhealthy foods so I try to do it when no one is around.


"When things like this happen I always think it's meant to be!.... I am strong and capable in my work and my life, even when I don't feel like it. "

Yesterday was an example of poor eating. C, WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO YOURSELF?? You are worthy. You love you!


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/2/2019 (04:10)
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5/1/19 4:29 A

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5/1/19 Food Memories

Foods often become embedded in your memory, not just because of how they taste, but because of the feelings you originally had around them. By tracing back to your earliest recollections of eating a food, you can identify the needs that were met at that time. When you crave that food now, you are probably experiencing some of the same needs as in your food memory.

Today

• List several favorite foods that often cause you problems or tempt you to overeat.
Not going to focus on the foods, but any food that is not very healthy.

• Recall events or places where you have eaten these foods, especially as a child. Describe the scenes, including the people you were with.

Eating out, parties, family gatherings.

• Identify one or two emotions that seem the strongest in each scene. Record your insights including times when that food connects to emotions now.

Worry / Anxiety
Disappointment with myself (I should be able to eat what I want without worry or guilt.)


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 5/1/2019 (04:30)
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4/30/19 4:17 A

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4/30/19 Food & fun

When your life is stressful or unhappy, food makes the world more bearable. Later, when the painful realities of your life return, you simply eat again. It seems quicker and easier than trying to invent new ways to entertain yourself or to cope with life challenges. You also may need to invent new ways to manage transitions in your day.

Today

• Identify places or times when food provides your main source of fun or entertainment.
When I am home alone
When I am bored and there is food
When I get home from work and I want to relax a bit

• Make a list of creative, non-food ways to have fun. Do one of them today.
Read my fiction or non/fiction books
Ask myself if I am hungry
Practice my bass
Surf the web or post on Spark / IE forum

• For situations where food provides a transition, invent ways to shake up your routine and follow a healthier pattern.

Yesterday the food I had when I got home from work was just a little boost before using the treadmill. I had some natural pb and 1 Halo.


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4/29/19 4:02 A

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4/29/19 Food & feelings

Emotional eating or using food as a friend happens to all of us at times. This type of eating serves a purpose, usually appeasing emotional needs or thought patterns. It also fixes things such as low self-esteem or feeling like a failure as well as emotions ranging from anger to despair. Keep learning how to identify and express your emotions rather than shoving them away with food.

Today

• List three of the most common times or situations where you do emotional eating.
When I am stressed (which I am most of the time)
When I am disappointed (when I feel I deserved better treatment, respect, or when I feel I deserve)
Social events so I can keep my hands busy

• For each one, add details including what might be going on or causing you to eat.

Bottom line: I have to care more about what goes in my body.

• For each one, write a plan for how you can take care of the real issue instead of reaching for food. Watch for times to use this today.

Food does not solve. Food makes me feel worse.
Sneak eating is no longer sneaky if I am gaining weight.

“Until you can learn to use your love in other ways besides food, you just won’t lose the weight”

"“…ever fail to listen to your body when it comes to intuitive eating? If so, then how do you get back on track?”

Yes, there are times when I do not listen to my body. Sometimes, accidentally (I just entirely forget to check-in with myself) and other times it’s on purpose (I really just want to eat for the purpose of eating/tasting/pleasure). Both of these give me no guilt (and if they do initially, I remind myself that “guilt never helps” and toss it out the window). My little mantra on guilt really helps me, as it gives me permission to let go of guilt. How is feeling guilty over something that I cannot control (already happened) going to help? It won’t – guilt only makes situations worse.

The other part of the question: “…If so, then how do you get back on track?”

We just learned that we can get back on track easily when we see this ALL of our ups & downs as progress, not failure. This feels counter-intuitive, I know… but let’s roll with it. If this is PROGRESS, then there must be something we can learn, right? In order to learn anything from my eating habits, I have to be communicating with myself (I tell my clients that they’re going to become their own best friends because they’ll talk to themselves so often). Here are some of the questions I might ask myself with corresponding scenarios:

Scenario – accidentally not listening to my body. Loving response: “Woah, I didn’t even realize I was doing that. Am I feeling stressed? Am I nervous? Anxious? What would really help me to feel calm right now?”
Scenario – purposefully not listening to my body. Loving response: “It’s okay that sometimes you just want to ‘eat whatever you want.’ Now that you have, how do you feel? Does this feel good? Would you want to relive this same feeling over?”
Scenario – trying to listen to my body, but feeling like I ‘just can’t stop eating.’ Loving response: “Are you fully believing that you can have this food anytime you want it again? Is there any part of you that feels limited, restricted, or guilty for eating this food? Is there anything else (experiences, thoughts, feelings, comments) going on in this moment that are causing you to feel tense, stressed, or just ‘bad’ in general?” And if so… “What is this food doing for you in the moment?” The food could be: numbing your stress, giving you comfort, company, a distraction, silencing your mind… etc…

Communicating with yourself in this way creates momentum and keeps you from being stuck in a bad-feeling situation. It helps me to recognize my own patters & better address them so that I can honor my bodies needs with Primary Foods (non-food sources of nourishment). Primary Foods are things like relationships, fun, joy, physical activity…"


paigeschmidt.com/how-i-sometimes-fai
l-
at-intuitive-eating/


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/29/2019 (17:05)
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4/28/19 4:13 P

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I will do that too, and then say I will not do it again... and a week later.. oh yeah.

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4/28/19 1:34 P

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Love yourself lighter sounds like a good one to add to your collection.

I ate chocolate yesterday, and potato chips, then felt quite sick!

Gill

Time Zone GMT (London) - yes, I'm hours ahead of most of you! Cornwall, UK

"...regardless of the short-term outcome, the very fact of your continuing to struggle is proof of your victory as a human being." Daisaku Ikeda

www.sparkpeople.com/system/howitwork
s.asp


Body Thrive - Autumn 2019 Anchor statement "I live a courageous life with energy and confidence"
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4/28/19 9:24 A

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4/28/19

So I have been snacking on chocolate. Having trouble stopping, as it feels restrictive. I know when I am at work this will not be an issue. I go back Monday.

I am still not OK with eating and eating and gaining (something the forum seems to sort of be OK with, so I am not posting this there). I have to fit health in now, not at the end... but do it without the diet mindset. This is challenging. Could be why I am eating the chocolate.

I may introduce a new book to the mix. So it is 100 Days (or More Days), Intuitive Eating, and I may add in "Love Yourself Lighter: How to End Your Weight Struggle by Changing the Way You Think" I think that may help put nutrition into my IE. I have a sample and really like it so far.

Bottom line, it is all up to me.

My quiz results:

Your Results: You have a love-hate relationship with your body.

You have a healthy perspective on some things but could stand to re-evaluate a few of your views and/or behaviors and how they affect your self-esteem and body image. Here are 5 ways to improve your body image:

Say something nice about yourself. For every negative thought, come back with a compliment. If you need to, write a few on post-its and stick them to the mirror or your computer screen. (Yes, I don't like myself enough)

Retrain your brain. Practice mindfulness by realizing your thought patterns, and reversing them if they are damaging. For example, when flipping through a magazine or watching television, if you notice yourself thinking, "Wow, if I only looked like that, then I'd be happy," remind yourself that looking like that requires make-up, special angles, airbrushing, and sometimes very restrictive diet and exercise plans (as well as great genetics). Plus, happiness is a state of mind, not the shape of your body.
(I do not compare myself to magazines, don't even read them, but I DO compare myself to people I see.)

Stop criticizing yourself and start criticizing the ads. Research the techniques that their creators employ to get the final, unrealistic result, and analyze ads instead of taking them at face value. (I will not criticize anything except the diet industry and food marketing.)

Exercise because it makes you feel good. If you hate the gym but drag yourself there just because you want to maintain your appearance, stop going! Instead, find an activity that you enjoy, like hiking, swimming, dancing, walking, biking, gardening, or sports, and stay fit that way instead.

(I LOVE using my treadmill!)

Be patient with yourself. Years of brainwashing won't disappear overnight. But if you adopt these techniques, bit by bit you'll learn how to like your body. After all, it's the only one you’ve got, so you're much better off appreciating it!

(I have no choice but to be patient and love myself. I am all I have.)

Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/28/2019 (09:53)
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4/27/19 9:01 A

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4/27/19

Still have a lot of reading to do, and I am learning a lot. Every now and then I can hear my body telling me when to eat and when I have had enough.

Another great treadmill workout today. I complete a 5K 5x a week. I can run at least 4minutes (5x) at 4.8mph. About a month ago I was a non-runner.

1. When you are tempted to overeat today, ask yourself: “will I be any
more satisfied than I am right now if I continue to eat?”

2. Food only brings temporary comfort - the moment you are done eating
is the same moment that the comfort from eating will end. Then
you’re left with what you started with. Instead of using food, find a
non-food source of nourishment that is truly fulfilling and satisfying.

3. Believe that you are enough, exactly where you are in this moment. You
are always enough. Wake up and, stretch first thing in the morning and
repeat with a smile: “I am so glad to be in my own body.”

4. Know that when you’re stressed, you will naturally eat more. Getting
stuffed forces your body to feel heavy, deeply relaxed, and acts as a
temporary distraction. Instead of stuffing yourself, think of other non-food
ways that you could get comfortable and relax without using food.

5. The way you view others is often a direct reflection of how you view
yourself. Start looking for true beauty in other women apart from
their bodies: a smile, confidence, joy, love, and kindness.

Together, let’s celebrate our amazing, smart, trustworthy bodies!
healthyhitsthespot.com/wp-content/up
lo
ads/2015/04/5ieaffirmations-2.pdf


So, when are you ready to add in gentle nutrition? There isn’t a black and white answer, but here are the signs that I look for in my clients:

they’re excited to feel good, because they believe they deserve to feel good
they’re not triyng to lose weight at the expense of honoring their bodies biological needs
they feel calm around food and they understand that eating food has nothing to do with their moral goodness or is a “good” or “bad” choice – they don’t say things like “I’m so bad for eating this” or “I’m so good for eating this!” Rather, they feel neutral about food and understand that some foods feel good and others don’t feel as good (that’s it!).

From there, they would like to honor their bodies with food that tastes great and feels great too. Thus, they are ready for some gentle nutrition.

paigeschmidt.com/wp-content/uploads/
20
18/03/PS_Day-of-IE_2018.pdf


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/27/2019 (11:55)
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4/26/19 5:00 A

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Day 40 Food & feelings

Emotional eating or using food as a friend happens to all of us at times. This type of eating serves a purpose, usually appeasing emotional needs or thought patterns. It also fixes things such as low self-esteem or feeling like a failure as well as emotions ranging from anger to despair. Keep learning how to identify and express your emotions rather than shoving them away with food.

Today

• List three of the most common times or situations where you do emotional eating.
After work
When I am alone
When no one sees me in the basement

• For each one, add details including what might be going on or causing you to eat.
After work I am de-stressing
When I am alone I can eat without judgement, same for the basement.

• For each one, write a plan for how you can take care of the real issue instead of reaching for food. Watch for times to use this today.

Think "Am I hungry? Do I really want to eat that?" I can always eat it later. Try to let go of critical thoughts. Treat myself the same way I would treat others.

Do I really want to buy new larger pants again?

My learn to run series kicked my butt today. I have muscles that hurt that I didn't even know I had.

Now I just need to think before I eat.

"When is the best time to start eating normally?

You’re not giving up on a coping strategy. Junk food doesn’t soothe you, it kills you. It is the biggest cause of stress in your life. It keeps you trapped in the same groundhog day, over and over again.

Your fears are based on a fiction: a story that you have created, as the result of experiencing hellish and restrictive diets. The transition from overweight to normal weight, while eating an honest diet is infinitely better than what you experience today; far better than a life of unhappiness, interspersed with inefficient attempts to block out the pain for a few moments a day. There is no misery in the journey to an optimal weight; you are escaping a period of misery.

Does a glass of oil appeal? No. Does a glass of sugar appeal? No. Because your brain sees them for what they are. It doesn’t matter how sweet those white crystals are, you are not tempted to chew down cupful after cupful, because your brain is not that stupid. We can see the trick. It doesn’t matter if we know that sugar is sweet and tastes nice on your tongue, the desire to gorge upon cupfuls of pure, refined sucrose crystals does not exist. It is only when these things are combined with artificial flavors, fake colors and other manmade concoctions (and tiny sprinklings of other ingredients) that we are fooled into thinking this is food. When our eyes and tongue assess the situation and we arrive at ‘food containing nutrients we need’, our brain signals pleasure. The promise of food is never fulfilled, however, because no matter how much we eat, we don’t get what we need.

The addictive element in modern food is not in an ingredient or a toxin, but a mismatch between what is promised and what is delivered. We need a wide range of raw materials to build ourselves – the building blocks of life (saturated fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals and, of course, energy). When we embark upon a restrictive diet, and plunge into psychological and physical misery, we end up gorging upon low-nourishment food. Perhaps, for the first time in our life, we eat a meal-sized (or banquet sized) serving that is almost entirely devoid of nourishment, but yet tastes delicious. This act leaves us confused, hungry, unsatisfied: worse off than before. The cycle of addiction begins.

Starvation, junk food addiction and the fear of impending restriction can all be removed in the same way: acquiring new information that changes your automatic perception of needs, and thus alters your cravings and desire, allowing you to eat normal, nourishing meals, once more.

Junk food addiction

A nourishing meal is not addictive. It satisfies and fuels your body, allowing it to grow strong and healthy. Flavoring agents coupled with an absence of nutrition, is addictive. It is not the great taste that is the problem – but artificial addition of taste to different foods. Without this, there is no cue to stop: satisfaction never arrives.

As with any addiction, junk food addiction creates gradual, incremental physical damage and social ostracism, slowly eating away your life…but the unbearable part is that we feel to blame. We did through our own actions. This knowledge creates unbridled hopelessness and shame. We know that something is wrong, something so confusing and terrible that all of our effort seems only to have made it worse and for some absurd reason, we can’t quite put our finger on what is wrong. We know we must, must, MUST fix it. We must get rid of this pain and hopeless and ridiculous behavior, but we don’t know how. Please, get rid of it now? So we do. We make the pain vanish, for this moment, using the only way we know.

This is the trap of addiction.

It is not a personal failing, but a mistake. It is a misunderstanding. Your brain attached happiness to something that caused pain, and you didn’t realise, until it was too late. You see, there’s something insidious about addiction: each layer of pain is so mild that you don’t notice the difference, until you’re so deep in the trap that you suddenly wake up.

Please don’t despair. There is a way out.

How to break food addiction easily

Just as your brain can choose not to signal the pain of a severed leg, when it realises that your life is at stake, it can stop the pain of addiction, using logic: truth. It can turn off those feelings and replace them with exhilaration, when you realise that escape is not only possible, but that you can do it. The right information can turn off your cravings, because the misery you feel is not related to your slowly eroding physical state, it is mental. It is a sensation that arises in your brain based upon your perception of the situation; your evaluation of the situation as hopeless. This evaluation can be changed, instantly, when you are presented with conflicting evidence that stands up to the beliefs in your brain.

Let’s not mince words. This is not just about aesthetics or social ostracism (which should not be minimized, because that threatens a survival need too: if you cannot find a mate and/or if society threatens to outcast you, this is a real threat to your genes)…but this is even worse than that. If you sacrifice real food for deceptive food on a continual basis, your life is in danger. Obesity (or rather, the chronic ingestion of food-like meals that deliver insufficient nourishment) causes more death than alcohol and drugs combined.

There is only one reason you eat excessive quantities of food. You crave it. Your brain has evaluated the data, thinks you need it and has generated a craving.

We’re going to examine every speck of that need. We are going to look at the self-perpetuating pain of addiction, that feeds upon itself and grows unnoticed, and expose the needs and fears for what they are. We are going to dismantle the misconceptions, piece by piece, until your brain realises it is ridiculous and turns the pain off. Then, you can transform discomfort into joy.
How to stop eating junk food right now

Cravings are triggered by knowledge in your head. You choose to eat deceptive food, because your brain presents this as the best course of action. You have repeated this so many times, that the behaviour runs on autopilot, but even if it did not, you would choose to do it. When the right information is presented to you, you choose differently.

To end a junk food addiction, you must eat normal, honest food. For most of us, normal eating means three meals a day, interspersed with occasional snacks if hungry. But in order to do this – in order for this simple task to make sense – there are several pieces of key information you must absorb. (For example, it seems obvious that the way to end a nicotine addiction is to stop smoking. Smokers know this, but struggle with how to make themselves do it. In a similar way, we know that if we set aside all of our crazy, disordered eating habits and just ate normal meals we would be fine, but we don’t know how. We often get stuck in years of attempted ‘intuitive eating’ while we wait in vain for our food intake to normalize (I spent three years trying to eat normally, while slowly growing fatter and fatter. The binge eating subsided, and became just perpetual, constant grazing)."


eatlikeanormalperson.com/best-time-t
o-
start/


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/26/2019 (16:46)
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Day 39: See your value

The words you say to yourself can affect nearly everything you do. Starting today, change the negative words you say to yourself. Instead of saying “I can’t do anything right,” hold your head up high and tell yourself, "I’m important, I’m valuable, and I count in this world."

Today

• Create two positive statements to use for your self-talk.
"I’m important, I’m valuable, and I count in this world."

• Write them on a card or piece of paper, then post them where you can read them often.

• Live as if these statements are true, then record your response.

They are true!
emoticon

Intuitive Eating: is a dynamic mind-body integration of instinct, emotion, and rational thought.

It is a personal process of honoring your health by paying attention to the messages of your body and meeting your physical and emotional needs.

It is an inner journey of discovery that puts you front and center; YOU are the expert of your own body. After all, only YOU know your thoughts, feelings, and experiences.

Only YOU know how hungry you are and what food or meal will satisfy you. No diet plan or guru could possibly know these things.

Do you have much experience in paying attention to and honoring your body? No
What might that mean for you in terms of cultivating patience and compassion with the process? This may take awhile.



Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/25/2019 (12:47)
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Awesome Ski! And thanks for sharing too!

I am reading the Intuitive Eating book and also belong to their forum. But you really can't be on a "diet" per say and be in their forum. Intuitive eating is about following yourself and letting go of diet rules.

My goal is to take care of me and if weigh loss follows that is great. With the exercise I am doing I doubt I will gain. I know a part of their idea is to throw out the scale and I agree as to why (they suggest it). I am just not ready to yet.

Day 38 Emotional cold

With an emotional cold, you feel a little moody, discouraged and slightly depressed. You aren’t dealing with deep issues that need counseling or medication. You just feel an emotional letdown or a sense of emptiness. If you learn to recognize the symptoms and start treating it right away, you’ll perk back up and recover a lot faster.

Today

• Create a first-aid kit for the next time you get an emotional cold.
EXERCISE! I feel awesome afterwards!

• Write a list of things you can do to help you recover when one hits.
• Do one of the thing on your list today. It might help prevent you from getting an emotional cold.


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/25/2019 (04:50)
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Oh my goodness, I like this article! I think that my combination of Castillo’s podcasts, Spark’s articles and menus, Linda’s books and this team, have all led me to the place where this is really where I am right now! C, thank you for sharing this and the link - I had never heard of this person. In poking around her site, I found this article she had written and with which I totally agree!

I especially love this sentence in the last paragraph: “Nobody canbe the expert of your body, except you.” emoticon emoticon emoticon

www.scribd.com/fullscreen/16
989363?acc
ess_key=key-aezpg2l9djymj775wet


Edited by: SKIRUNNER1 at: 4/23/2019 (21:27)

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Honor your health with gentle nutrition

Honoring your health with gentle nutrition is the last principle for a reason. It’s critical to heal your relationship with your food, mind, and body first. If you are ready to begin exploring gentle nutrition, this post is for you. No worries if you’re not—come back to this post when the timing feels right for YOU

PRINCIPLE 10 HONOR YOUR HEALTH WITH GENTLE NUTRITION

Make food choices that honor your health and taste buds while making you feel well. Remember that you don’t have to eat a perfect diet to be healthy. You will not suddenly get a nutrient deficiency based on one snack, one meal, or one day. It’s what you eat consistently over time that matters – progress not perfection is what counts.=

THE PRACTICE

To practice this principle, I invite you to assess your Food-Body Choice Congruence. What this means is exploring how foods feel in your body – that is, how eating a particular food or meal makes you feel, physically. This internal awareness causes a shift in how you decide what to eat, going beyond what your taste buds may crave. It means that the tongue is not the only part of the body that we honor when making food choices.


What specific foods and meals leave you feeling most nourished, sustained & strong?

What’s your favorite go-to meal, when you are pushed for time—but is easy to make, and will sustain you?

What motivates your food choices? Sometimes a special way of eating gives a person an identity, or makes them feel good about themselves. Explore if that might be true for you? If it’s true how might that be effecting your connection to your body?

For those of you who’ve mastered this principle, for the most part, what was the turning point or an aha moment?

Gentle nutrition is an ongoing process of learning and discovery. It’s not one-size-fits-all, and its meaning may shift with the different seasons of your life. Our bodies are dynamic and ever-changing: be patient & approach this practice with curiosity & compassion.

evelyntribole.com/principle-10-honor
-y
our-health-with-gentle-nutrition/


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/23/2019 (14:43)
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Day 37 I'm not done yet

What are some areas where you aren’t done yet? In terms of your weight-loss and exercise goals, think about areas where you would truly say you aren’t done yet. Start building your list, then figure out the action steps it will take to continue making progress on those areas.

Today

• Identify at least three things or life areas you aren’t done with yet. Living and getting healthier

• Decide on steps you can take today on each of these items. Think before I eat and ask myself "Do I want to eat that?"
• With each of those actions, record that you’ve completed them.


IE:

1. Reject the Diet Mentality

Throw out the diet books and magazine articles that offer you false hope of losing weight quickly, easily, and permanently. Get angry at the lies that have led you to feel as if you were a failure every time a new diet stopped working and you gained back all of the weight. If you allow even one small hope to linger that a new and better diet might be lurking around the corner, it will prevent you from being free to rediscover Intuitive Eating.

2. Honor Your Hunger (This is very tough for me right now)

Keep your body biologically fed with adequate energy and carbohydrates. Otherwise you can trigger a primal drive to overeat. Once you reach the moment of excessive hunger, all intentions of moderate, conscious eating are fleeting and irrelevant. Learning to honor this first biological signal sets the stage for re-building trust with yourself and food.

3. Make Peace with Food

Call a truce, stop the food fight! Give yourself unconditional permission to eat. If you tell yourself that you can’t or shouldn’t have a particular food, it can lead to intense feelings of deprivation that build into uncontrollable cravings and, often, bingeing When you finally “give-in” to your forbidden food, eating will be experienced with such intensity, it usually results in Last Supper overeating, and overwhelming guilt.

4. Challenge the Food Police

Scream a loud “NO” to thoughts in your head that declare you’re “good” for eating minimal calories or “bad” because you ate a piece of chocolate cake. The Food Police monitor the unreasonable rules that dieting has created. The police station is housed deep in your psyche, and its loud speaker shouts negative barbs, hopeless phrases, and guilt-provoking indictments. Chasing the Food Police away is a critical step in returning to Intuitive Eating.

5. Respect Your Fullness (I do this, then eat before I am hungry again)

Listen for the body signals that tell you that you are no longer hungry. Observe the signs that show that you’re comfortably full. Pause in the middle of a meal or food and ask yourself how the food tastes, and what is your current fullness level?

6. Discover the Satisfaction Factor

The Japanese have the wisdom to promote pleasure as one of their goals of healthy living. In our fury to be thin and healthy, we often overlook one of the most basic gifts of existence–the pleasure and satisfaction that can be found in the eating experience. When you eat what you really want, in an environment that is inviting and conducive, the pleasure you derive will be a powerful force in helping you feel satisfied and content. By providing this experience for yourself, you will find that it takes much less food to decide you’ve had “enough”.

7. Honor Your Feelings Without Using Food

Find ways to comfort, nurture, distract, and resolve your issues without using food. Anxiety, loneliness, boredom, anger are emotions we all experience throughout life. Each has its own trigger, and each has its own appeasement. Food won’t fix any of these feelings. It may comfort for the short term, distract from the pain, or even numb you into a food hangover. But food won’t solve the problem. If anything, eating for an emotional hunger will only make you feel worse in the long run. You’ll ultimately have to deal with the source of the emotion, as well as the discomfort of overeating.

8. Respect Your Body

Accept your genetic blueprint. Just as a person with a shoe size of eight would not expect to realistically squeeze into a size six, it is equally as futile (and uncomfortable) to have the same expectation with body size. But mostly, respect your body, so you can feel better about who you are. It’s hard to reject the diet mentality if you are unrealistic and overly critical about your body shape.

9. Exercise—Feel the Difference (I am doing GREAT with this)

Forget militant exercise. Just get active and feel the difference. Shift your focus to how it feels to move your body, rather than the calorie burning effect of exercise. If you focus on how you feel from working out, such as energized, it can make the difference between rolling out of bed for a brisk morning walk or hitting the snooze alarm. If when you wake up, your only goal is to lose weight, it’s usually not a motivating factor in that moment of time.

10. Honor Your Health

Gentle Nutrition Make food choices that honor your health and tastebuds while making you feel well. Remember that you don’t have to eat a perfect diet to be healthy. You will not suddenly get a nutrient deficiency or gain weight from one snack, one meal, or one day of eating. It’s what you eat consistently over time that matters, progress not perfection is what counts.

Intuitive Eating is not “giving up” and just eating whatever the heck you want.

One of the important parts of intuitive eating is giving yourself unconditional permission to eat, but that permission is not eating with reckless abandon. It’s the complete opposite. Instead, it is unconditional permission to eat, but with curiosity and non-judgment. Truly having unconditional permission to eat allows us to learn to how to make peace with food, remove the emotional power of a “fear food” and learn to feel safe around ALL foods.

Intuitive eating is about trusting your inner body wisdom to make choices around food that feel good in your body, without judgment and without influence from diet culture. We are all born with the skill to eat, to stop when we are full, to eat when we are hungry and to eat satisfying foods. As we grow up that can change for a variety of reasons. Many of us lose that freedom and intuitive eating is learning to reclaim it. When we filter out the noise and influence that diet culture presents to us as false truths, we can then truly listen to what our body wants and needs from food.

Intuitive eating is a peace movement. It’s ending the war with your body, learning to accept our diverse genetic blueprint. Diet culture would have us believe all the rules we have around food as gospel because they are all, in some way, focused on the thin ideal; that any body other than a thin one, is wrong. Those food rules lead to an emotional value placed on food and when we put that emotional value on food, we then internalize it as we eat and that leads to thoughts like, “I’m so bad because I ate XXXXXX.”

Let me be clear, food is not good or bad and labeling it as such can pose many problems. Nutritionally, just like bodies, all foods are different. Emotionally though, all foods must be equal. One food does not make you bad while the other makes you good. If we can approach ALL FOODS as emotionally equal, we can truly begin to connect with our own inner wisdom. Intuitive eating is about making peace with food and giving up the needless war against our body and how we eat.

Intuitive eating is challenging and can difficult to understand. It’s completely opposite of how we’ve been taught to think about food. It’s not black or white, it’s gray, nuanced and there is no one “right way” which is why it can be so confusing.

Intuitive eating is a beautiful part of recovery. It is also an essential piece in the prevention of eating disorders.


nationaleatingdisorders.org/blog/wha
t-
does-intuitive-eating-mean


https://www.health.com/nutrition/intuiti
ve-eating health.com/nutrition/intuitive-eatin
g


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/23/2019 (14:23)
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4/22/19 5:40 A

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Day 36 My Strengths:


Create a list of your strengths. Include phrases such as good weight or physically fit even if right now your weight is up and you haven’t exercised in a while. Don’t discount items on your list by saying, “I’m not really pretty or attractive or creative.” Instead, hold tightly to the belief that you have these strengths, even during times when you don’t feel them or do them.

Today

• In the space below, write “My strengths, even if I don’t always believe them or do them.”


1) Physical attributes: As far as I know I am healthy, and all my remaining parts work.

2) Skills and abilities: I am organized, a bass player and singer, tech savy, and I can read and write!

3) Personality traits: Compassionate, considerate, kind, loving, honest (most of the time, LOL!)

Then sing the categories of physical attributes, skills and abilities, and personality traits, create a list of your strengths.


• When you finish your list read it out loud. Write a note about how this feels.

I am feeling good. I also just finished my workout.

Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/22/2019 (09:23)
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4/19/19 5:38 P

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Day 35: Need for renewal


When you become life tired, self-nurturing activities such as taking a bath or listening to music can help. But sometimes, they aren’t enough. You need a deeper level of healing, one that reaches your core and pulls it back up. You need renewal.

Today

• Decide when you’ll do a renewal walk. Allow plenty of time to focus on details.
• Record what you noticed or experienced with each of your five senses.
• Write notes about how your energy and your inner spirit felt after the renewal walk.

Not doing well with eating. Lots of sneak eating going on while I am trying to figure things out. I feel I can't eat sugary foods in front of my family. Like they expect me to be on a diet and only eat healthy foods.



Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/19/2019 (17:42)
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4/18/19 6:31 A

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Day 34: Food replaces meaning

Take a look at the amount of meaning in your own life right now. Even if you can’t change jobs or skip classes and events, you can work on building meaning in other areas. Perhaps it’s time to join a book club or volunteer at a homeless shelter. Or pull out your recipe books and find meaning in creating healthy meals.

Today
• Write a list of things that currently give you meaning in your life.
My family
Me
My dog
My friends


• Decide where you can add more things or cultivate the ones you have.


• Do at least one activity that builds your sense of meaning. Record what you did.

Be the best Me I can be! Love!

(I am not using these lessons for weight loss, and will only use the lessons that do not pertain to dieting.)


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/18/2019 (16:42)
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4/17/19 4:43 A

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Day 33: Create some Joy

I could really use some nurturing or a bit of encouragement. But there’s no one to give me attention or kindness when I need it. People around me are concerned about their own lives and don’t even notice my sad mood or my frustration. As a result, I’ve learned that I have to take care of my own needs for nurturing.

Today

Create your list of What I Love.

Me
My kids
My husband
My dog
Rainbows
My Friends
Ice Cream
How I feel after exercising
Treating my body well
Not being on a diet plan
Being in a healthy weight range
Being alive
Laughing
Smiling
Playing electric bass in our basement band
Honesty
Love
Band-aids (I have a blister on my foot)
Spring (season)
Seeing my children happy
Knowing I can pay a bill
Trust

Mark any that you haven’t done or appreciated in the past six months.

• Choose one thing from your list and use it today for nurturing or encouragement.



"Kick Diet-Mind to the Curb Day 3: How do I eat normally??

Maybe you’re over the food obsession. Perhaps you can’t think of counting another calorie or “point” or gram. You’re tired of putting in so much effort with so little return. You’re tired of the weight roller coaster, and still never feeling okay about yourself. And you really want to be done with chronic hunger and food binges.

The problem is – you don’t even know how to eat “normally” anymore. What the hell is “normal” eating anyway?!?

“Normal” eating is eating without the drama of counting calories, or fat grams, or “points.” It’s putting some thought into what you’re going to eat, but not a whole day’s worth. It’s not feeling guilty after you eat something that isn’t calorie-free air food. It’s feeling okay about how you eat, and not freaked the hell out about how eat bite will affect your body.

It’s eating the right amount for your body, based on what our bodies tell us.

Wait…what? Our bodies tell us?! How do they tell us??

When I was confronted first with the idea that there might be another way to live where I wasn’t chronically starving, and then with my own realization that I wasn’t even achieving happiness with my diet efforts, I was totally confused about how to eat.

It turns out, our bodies tell us exactly when and how much to eat. We’re all equipped with feelings of hunger and fullness – even if we’re not in touch with them right now. Dieting can disconnect us from these signals, but the good news is, we can eventually get back in touch with them.

I went cold turkey on my diet. I floundered. I struggled with knowing how much and what to eat and how to stop eating when I was full and not panic about hunger till the next meal. But I immersed myself in the ways of non-diet eating and I finally got there…total normalcy with food.

You can do it too, if that's what you want.

If you feel like your dieting is still working for you, I am not here to tell you otherwise. We all get to choose the path that is right for us.

However, if you’re feeling like it’s time to finally kick your diet habit to the curb forever, go for it! There are many skills to learn and practice, but compared to just about any diet you've been on, learning to eat normally is totally doable, satisfying and so much more enjoyable.

Eating Activity:

Are you out of touch with your hunger and fullness? Do you struggle to know when to eat and when to stop? Then it’s time to start noting those signals that you’re still in touch with, and the ones that you need to find again.

Today, start to tune into the sensations in your stomach at three different times: before you eat a meal, when you’re done, and sometime in between meals. Name the sensations. You might use phrases like “Somewhat hungry” or “slightly hollow” or “some stretch in my stomach.”

If you’ve been ignoring your eating cues for a long time, it might be hard to sense anything at first. This is one of those skills that needs practice, time and patience. Eventually, your body will whisper back to you that vital information needed to eat with peace."

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Day 32: Make exercise work

Rather than setting your sights on being the poster child for bodybuilding, do the types of exercise that work for you.

What’s most important is that you move versus not move. So keep working on your exercise program, even if it’s small. Over time, the results will show, and you’ll know it was all worth the effort.

Today

• Write down the smallest amount of exercise you could do most days.

My mini habit is at least 7 push ups a day. I started at one and am now completing 8 a day.
Another mini habit is at least 2 miles on the treadmill 4 days a week. I complete 3.14 5 days a week and run part of it at 4.6 mph.

• Plan how you will put that in place today.
Push ups complete. I do them as I heat up my breakfast in the morning.
Treadmill is after work.

• Record what you did and how it felt to have a small, realistic goal.
It feels great to complete each!


"One of the most common reasons people try to "skip out" on the process is due in part to a fear of the inevitable failure that comes with trying to reach your goals. Many people are scared to fail, lose or not succeed immediately, but it's these valuables failures along the way to success that are the missing link for many people. Don't be afraid to fail in the micro to succeed in the macro."

How to Turn Failures Into Successes

Unfortunately, this can all be easier said than done. While it feels simple to plan for how you'll handle things not going as planned, it's more difficult to take on this mindset as it's happening and feels like your whole world is crashing down. In those times of struggle, it's important to take the time to sit down and reflect on what's happening, rather than running at the first sign of trouble. These three steps help me find positivity in negative situations and allow me to refocus my energy toward finding a solution, rather than dwelling on the problem itself.

1. Evaluate

First, take an unbiased look at the challenge. Ask yourself how the challenge could have been limited or avoided. Be honest with yourself about whether this was out of your control or if it was partially self-inflicted.

For example, many times, if you get fired from a job, it does not come without at least one warning. And if you do get fired abruptly, there is usually a specific incident tied to that decision. If you're in this situation, take a look at some of the factors that may have played a role in the ultimate outcome so you can identify areas for improvement.

2. Adapt

After evaluating the problem and coming to terms with what type of failure just occurred, it's time to adapt, putting our energy and focus on the solution. Giving unnecessary time and energy to the problem will only highlight the event and give it power; we want to work on the response to that event.

Imagine you evaluated the loss of your job and realize that you have been fired due to four consecutive months of drastic under-performance and two written warnings on the matter. After reflecting, you identify that your poor performance was due to the fact that you did not believe in the product you were responsible for selling. Moving forward in your job search, you should make it a point to only consider opportunities that you truly find interesting and about which you can be passionate. Otherwise, you may end up repeating this cycle anywhere you go.

3. Execute

After reflection, it's time for action. In this ongoing example, you could create a list of all the local companies that have good ratings as far as employee happiness and start applying there first. Or research companies that are in a field you admire or create products that are of interest to you. Armed with the knowledge that your poor performance at your last job was due in part to a lack of enthusiasm and happiness, you now have a plan of attack for avoiding that same trap and only pursuing opportunities that you find exciting.

Failures will happen at some point in everyone's life. The people who come out on top are those who value those missteps as stepping stones on their way toward their goals. The next time you find yourself face-to-face with failure, greet it as an old friend, reflect on its presence and learn how to use it in your pursuit of your own personal growth.
sparkpeople.com/blog/blog.asp?post=t
he
_missing_link_valuable_failures

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Becoming an intuitive eater

Many people who have diabetes feel betrayed by their body and find it difficult to trust that their body can actually support them in eating well. However, research shows that you can learn to read your body’s signals and respond to them in a loving, nourishing way. Intuitive eating means eating what feels right to you, when it feels right. This approach helps you to reclaim the pleasure in eating and at the same time allows your body to help you manage your diabetes.

The first step in becoming an intuitive eater is to shift away from external rules about when you should eat and to learn to listen to your body’s internal cues. We were all born with the ability to know when we are physically hungry, and you can reconnect with this natural signal.

To identify your physical hunger, pay attention to signals such as an empty or gnawing feeling in your stomach, a feeling of low energy or lethargy, a headache, difficulty concentrating, irritability, or persistent thoughts of food.

Each person experiences hunger a little differently, and your job is to learn what hunger feels like to you. Checking your blood glucose level when you feel these sensations can provide you with valuable information. If it is low, the feeling you are experiencing is indeed physical hunger. If your blood glucose is high, your impulse to eat may be coming from an emotional rather than a physical trigger, but that’s not always the case. If for some reason your body doesn’t have enough insulin available to move the glucose in your bloodstream into the cells that need it, you may be experiencing real hunger. Insufficient insulin can result from not enough being injected (in those who inject insulin) or from a pancreas that simply can’t put out enough to handle the level of glucose in the blood. And while food is the best-known contributor to glucose in the bloodstream, high blood glucose can also occur after intense exercise, as a consequence of an infection (even one that you’re not aware of having), and as a side effect of certain drugs.

Having high blood glucose when you’re feeling hungry, therefore, is an opportunity to think about what’s going on for you at that moment and to ask yourself whether your urge to eat is coming from a physical trigger or an emotional one.

As you become an intuitive eater, you can experiment with different amounts and combinations of foods and get feedback through assessing how you feel and checking your blood glucose level. If you take insulin, you can also experiment with the dose and timing.

You’ll find that responding to true hunger is one way to put the pleasure back in eating; food actually tastes better when you are hungry. To ensure that you can eat what you want when you are hungry, it’s a good strategy to always carry a bag of food with you that includes a wide range of options.

If you find that you are frequently turning to food before you are physically hungry, ask yourself, “Can I wait?” Remind yourself that as soon as you are hungry, you will eat. The more you practice listening to your body’s signals and responding to them, the less you will feel the drive to eat when you’re not really hungry. However, if you continue to turn to food for emotional reasons in spite of this work, consider doing some further reading or seeking counseling to learn how to manage your feelings without reaching for food.
Choosing what to eat

Just as it’s important to move away from external rules about when to eat, it’s also important to let go of the rules about what you “should” or “shouldn’t” eat. Instead, think about what food(s) would feel truly nourishing in your body. By choosing foods you like that will also keep your body feeling well, you can end the feelings of deprivation you may have surrounding food.

When you eat, pay attention to how various foods affect you. Note how you feel physically and mentally before and after eating. Check your blood glucose level before and two hours after eating for additional feedback on the foods you chose. The more you do this, the more you will feel in charge of your eating and your diabetes care, rather than feeling controlled by them.

Here are some examples of how people with diabetes are using intuitive eating in their everyday lives:

Kara experimented with different types of food as she moved toward intuitive eating. For lunch one day, she made a burrito filled with beans, vegetables, brown rice, and cheese. She felt nourished by this meal, and her energy level felt great. Her blood glucose check two hours after the start of this meal confirmed that she was in an acceptable range. Kara’s positive eating experience resulted, in part, from the fact that her meal was high in fiber from the beans, vegetables, and brown rice. The fiber both filled her up and slowed the rate of glucose entering her bloodstream, keeping it at a healthy level. Kara was careful to concentrate on how foods felt in her body, which guided her to make choices that supported her wellness.

Jesse loved to eat fried chicken. However, when he checked his blood glucose level two hours after eating a fried chicken meal, it was over 300 mg/dl – well above the preferred range of less than 180 mg/dl two hours after a meal. Jesse recognized that he had also eaten mashed potatoes, gravy, and creamed corn because they were included with the meal, not because he really wanted them. He decided that in the future he would tune in to what he really wanted, not just eat what was offered. The next time he ate fried chicken, he chose green beans and a baked potato as side dishes. His blood glucose level following this meal was 164 mg/dl. Through this process, Jesse learned how his body reacts to various foods. He was able to continue eating the foods he loves while successfully managing his diabetes. In the future, if Jesse wanted to eat the mashed potatoes, gravy, and corn with his fried chicken, he could experiment with eating a smaller quantity of each to keep his blood glucose level down.

Chris loved to eat bread. When she checked her blood glucose level a couple of hours after eating several slices from a freshly baked loaf, it was too high. She started to pair the bread with some peanut butter, which helped keep her blood glucose below 180 mg/dl, since fat helps slow the rate at which glucose gets into the blood. Knowing that a high-fat snack or meal can cause a delayed rise in blood glucose after eating, Chris also checked her blood glucose level three to four hours after her snack to receive additional feedback.

Remember the gooey cake that Jenna wished she could eat without guilt at her son’s birthday party? After several months of practicing intuitive eating, Jenna realized that on days when she sat around the house, eating a piece of cake would send her blood glucose level too high, leaving her feeling tired. But when she was physically active, she felt better, and her blood glucose level tended to stay in a healthy range. So after a wonderful celebration of her son’s fifth birthday, she took her dog for a long walk. Her goal is to walk more regularly. For now, though, she is glad to know that walking helps get glucose out of her blood and into her cells without requiring more insulin. This motivates her to be more active and also enables her to enjoy her cake.

Becoming an intuitive eater and learning how to feed yourself in a way that gives you pleasure takes some experimentation. The payoff is the feeling of sustained energy that comes from matching your hunger with pleasurable, nourishing food choices.
Stopping when full

When you are hungry and eat exactly what you are hungry for, it feels very satisfying. As you eat, there’s a point when you’ve had enough, and the food no longer tastes as good. By paying attention to this internal cue, you can stop eating when you are full so that your body feels satisfied and comfortable. But keep in mind that if there is no physical hunger signal to start eating, there will be no internal signal to stop.

One thought that may make it easier for you to put down your fork or spoon when you’ve had enough is that when you are hungry again, you will eat again – the same food as you are eating now, or something else, if you prefer.

There may be times when you suddenly feel hungry again even though you recently finished eating. This may be because your insulin-resistant cells have not yet received the energy from the meal. Try making your meals smaller, in this case, and eating more frequently. Smaller meals will require your pancreas to release less insulin, so you may have a better match between the amount of glucose from the meal and the amount of available insulin. You will learn in time, based on the way your body feels, how much food is right for you at a particular moment.

Craving food after a filling meal may also mean that your food choices didn’t entirely satisfy your needs. Hillary found that when she ate salmon, a plain baked potato, and vegetables for dinner, she would overeat cookies later in the evening even though she wasn’t hungry. Upon reflection, she realized that while she loved the foods she chose, something was missing. In her effort to reduce her fat intake so that she might lose weight, she never felt completely satisfied after a meal. She tried having some cheese and crackers before dinner and found that at the end of the meal she felt comfortably full – eliminating the nighttime overeating of cookies that she didn’t really want. On the evenings when she did want something sweet after dinner, she had some cookies or fruit – depending on what she felt like eating at the time – and stopped when she felt satisfied. Hillary recently saw her doctor for a checkup and was pleased by her HbA1c test results, which are a measure of blood glucose control over the past two to four months.
Starting your journey

As you become an intuitive eater, honoring your internal cues and reclaiming the pleasure in eating, you will be in a much stronger position to make decisions about your health. The transition from a focus on dietary control and weight loss to the HAES mindset, with an emphasis on wellness, will put you in charge of managing your diabetes and altering your choices as necessary.

After six months of learning to become an intuitive eater, Jenna reported: “The best part is that the internal guidance of my body’s cues is reliable. I don’t feel bad about ‘cheating’ anymore because there’s no such thing – it’s just eating! I’ve loved getting back in touch with my real stomach hunger and enjoying what I eat, instead of rushing through and eating as much as I can since, as a large person, I’m ‘not supposed’ to eat. I find that I feel better and have more energy when I eat healthful foods. I certainly don’t deprive myself, but I do try to pay attention to enjoying really good food, prepared with love and eaten slowly. My blood sugar readings have improved significantly, and I’m nicer, too!”

As mentioned earlier, it takes time and practice to develop the skills of intuitive eating.

diabetesselfmanagement.com/nutrition
-e
xercise/nutrition/intuitive-eating/


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/16/2019 (04:37)
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4/15/19 4:21 A

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Day 31: Restore Yourself

Every day, work on restoring a tiny bit of your life. As the months go by, you’ll be able to see a lot more of your original structure, beauty and value.

Even when it’s hard, keep your vision clear and focused. Some parts will be easy to rebuild, others quite difficult. But eventually your efforts will pay off as you restore and appreciate your life.

Today


• Write a list of areas you’d like to restore in your life.
Food sanity! Looking into Intuitive eating

• For each item, write down one thing that will help you begin restoring it.
Read my book and post at least 1x a day in the forum

• Choose one goal and take action on it today. Record what you did.

_______

10 Principles of Intuitive Eating

1. Reject the Diet Mentality

Throw out the diet books and magazine articles that offer you false hope of losing weight quickly, easily, and permanently. Get angry at the lies that have led you to feel as if you were a failure every time a new diet stopped working and you gained back all of the weight. If you allow even one small hope to linger that a new and better diet might be lurking around the corner, it will prevent you from being free to rediscover Intuitive Eating.

2. Honor Your Hunger

Keep your body biologically fed with adequate energy and carbohydrates. Otherwise you can trigger a primal drive to overeat. Once you reach the moment of excessive hunger, all intentions of moderate, conscious eating are fleeting and irrelevant. Learning to honor this first biological signal sets the stage for re-building trust with yourself and food.

3. Make Peace with Food

Call a truce, stop the food fight! Give yourself unconditional permission to eat. If you tell yourself that you can’t or shouldn’t have a particular food, it can lead to intense feelings of deprivation that build into uncontrollable cravings and, often, bingeing When you finally “give-in” to your forbidden food, eating will be experienced with such intensity, it usually results in Last Supper overeating, and overwhelming guilt.

4. Challenge the Food Police

Scream a loud “NO” to thoughts in your head that declare you’re “good” for eating minimal calories or “bad” because you ate a piece of chocolate cake. The Food Police monitor the unreasonable rules that dieting has created. The police station is housed deep in your psyche, and its loud speaker shouts negative barbs, hopeless phrases, and guilt-provoking indictments. Chasing the Food Police away is a critical step in returning to Intuitive Eating.

5. Respect Your Fullness

Listen for the body signals that tell you that you are no longer hungry. Observe the signs that show that you’re comfortably full. Pause in the middle of a meal or food and ask yourself how the food tastes, and what is your current fullness level?

6. Discover the Satisfaction Factor

The Japanese have the wisdom to promote pleasure as one of their goals of healthy living. In our fury to be thin and healthy, we often overlook one of the most basic gifts of existence–the pleasure and satisfaction that can be found in the eating experience. When you eat what you really want, in an environment that is inviting and conducive, the pleasure you derive will be a powerful force in helping you feel satisfied and content. By providing this experience for yourself, you will find that it takes much less food to decide you’ve had “enough”.

7. Honor Your Feelings Without Using Food

Find ways to comfort, nurture, distract, and resolve your issues without using food. Anxiety, loneliness, boredom, anger are emotions we all experience throughout life. Each has its own trigger, and each has its own appeasement. Food won’t fix any of these feelings. It may comfort for the short term, distract from the pain, or even numb you into a food hangover. But food won’t solve the problem. If anything, eating for an emotional hunger will only make you feel worse in the long run. You’ll ultimately have to deal with the source of the emotion, as well as the discomfort of overeating.

8. Respect Your Body

Accept your genetic blueprint. Just as a person with a shoe size of eight would not expect to realistically squeeze into a size six, it is equally as futile (and uncomfortable) to have the same expectation with body size. But mostly, respect your body, so you can feel better about who you are. It’s hard to reject the diet mentality if you are unrealistic and overly critical about your body shape.

9. Exercise—Feel the Difference

Forget militant exercise. Just get active and feel the difference. Shift your focus to how it feels to move your body, rather than the calorie burning effect of exercise. If you focus on how you feel from working out, such as energized, it can make the difference between rolling out of bed for a brisk morning walk or hitting the snooze alarm. If when you wake up, your only goal is to lose weight, it’s usually not a motivating factor in that moment of time.

10. Honor Your Health

Gentle Nutrition Make food choices that honor your health and tastebuds while making you feel well. Remember that you don’t have to eat a perfect diet to be healthy. You will not suddenly get a nutrient deficiency or gain weight from one snack, one meal, or one day of eating. It’s what you eat consistently over time that matters, progress not perfection is what counts.

What is Intuitive Eating?

Intuitive Eating is an evidenced-based, mind-body health approach, comprised of 10 Principles and created by two dietitians, Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch in 1995. It is a weight-neutral model with a validated assessment scale and over 90 studies to date (Tribole 2017). It’s thrilling to see all the research and gives me great hope. Intuitive Eating is a dynamic integration between mind and body. The principles work by either cultivating or removing obstacles to body awareness, a process known as interoceptive awareness. Essentially, Intuitive Eating is a personal process of honoring health by listening and responding to the direct messages of the body in order to meet your physical and psychological needs.


What is NOT Intuitive Eating?

Intuitive Eating is not a diet or food plan. Period. There is no pass or fail, therefore there is no “blowing it”, rather it’s a journey of self-discovery and connection to the needs of your mind and body. There is nothing to count: this includes no counting of calories, carbs, points, or macros. If a health professional or coach is offering you Intuitive Eating for the purpose of weight loss–run away. Fast. (This has been such a problem that in 2007, we started training and certifying health professionals in the Intuitive Eating process. To find a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor in your area, read here.) There is not a single long-term study that shows that weight-loss dieting is sustainable. Study after study, shows that dieting and food restriction for the purpose of weight loss leads to more weight gain. Yes, weight gain (Rothblum 2018). Worse–the focus and preoccupation on weight leads to body dissatisfaction and weight stigma, which negatively impacts health (O’Hara & Taylor 2018).

Ultimately, you are the expert of your body. Only you know what hunger, fullness, and satisfaction feels like. Only you know your thoughts, feelings, and experiences. Intuitive Eating is an empowerment tool–it’s time to unleash it and liberate yourself from the prison of diet culture and weight obsession.

intuitiveeating.org/10-principles-of
-i
ntuitive-eating/


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/15/2019 (04:47)
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4/14/19 8:00 A

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4/14

Emotional eating
Eating because it is there
Eating because it is there and no one will know....but me

That was my Friday and Saturday

I am kicking butt on the treadmill. Completed a 5K on it yesterday.

Pattern: 1 min run at 4.5 mph, 2 minuted speed walk at 3.3 mph

As I learn more from my learn to run series, the run time will increase. Today is a day off. My body needs it. Tomorrow back to the lessons.

------------------------
1. Reject the Diet Mentality. Think about it: where has your focus on weight loss gotten you to at this point in your life? What has it done to your body? Your mind? It’s not about your lack of willpower or about you being a failure. It’s the system of dieting that is the problem – diets are a set up for failure. Research shows that the act of dieting increases your risk of gaining weight. Remind yourself: if dieting is the problem, how can it be part of the solution? Reject the idea that there are any good diets out there. Get rid of books and magazines that tout diets and easy or quick weight loss. Unfollow social media accounts that propel the dieting myth and diet behaviors (especially those that make you feel bad about yourself).

2. Honor Your Hunger. Hunger is not a four-letter word – it is a normal, biological process. Your body needs to know, and to trust, that it consistently will have access to food. If you try to override feelings of hunger and don’t eat enough calories and carbohydrates, your body reacts with cravings and binges. Are there times when you feel hunger, but didn’t eat? How come? Utilize the hunger-fullness scale to get started with honoring your hunger.

3. Make Peace with Food. Allow all foods into your diet and give yourself unconditional permission to eat whatever you want. Stop categorizing foods as “good” or “bad” – no one food has the power to make you healthy, just like no one food has the power to make you unhealthy. If you tell yourself you can’t have or shouldn’t have a certain food, you will eventually feel deprived; this deprivation builds into uncontrollable cravings and overeating. When you finally “give in” to that food, you’re likely to overeat – since you don’t know when you’ll be able to have it again. This overeating triggers guilt, which starts the cycle all over again: deprivation or restriction –> cravings and overeating –> feelings of guilt.

4. Challenge the Food Police. The food police are the thoughts in your head that declare you as “good” for eating a salad for lunch and “bad” because you ate dessert/carbs/sugar/etc. These are the unreasonable rules that were created by dieting that cause you to feel guilty. These rules are housed deep in your brain and pop up on a daily basis to govern your food decisions. It’s impossible to view eating as a normal, pleasurable activity when the food police have hold. Challenging the food police is an important step towards becoming an intuitive eater.

5. Feel Your Fullness. Dieting causes us to feel like we “have” to eat at meal times – when it is allowed – so leaving food behind can be difficult. Listen for signals that tell you that you are feeling full and satiated. Pause partway through a meal or snack and check in with your body. How does the food taste? How full do you feel? Bring more consciousness and awareness to your meals. Utilizing the hunger-fullness scale can help.

6. Discover the Satisfaction Factor. It’s possible to be physically full but not satisfied. If you’re unsatisfied you’ll probably keep looking for that one thing that is going to make you feel satisfied and content and you’re likely to overeat. When you eat what you really want, the feelings of satisfaction and pleasure you feel will help you be content (and often with less food).7. Cope With Your Emotions Without Using Food. Emotional eating is very common. We often eat for reasons other than physical hunger and food is often used to cover up unpleasant feelings and emotions. It’s important to find ways to comfort yourself and resolve your emotions without using food.

8. Respect Your Body. We’re so quick to judge ourselves and criticize our bodies. Learning to respect your body for how it is at this moment is an important tenant of Intuitive Eating. If you are too critical of your body and don’t accept yourself as you are, it’s hard to reject the diet mentality.

9. Exercise – Feel The Difference. Instead of focusing on the exercise you think you “should” be doing, shift your focus to what types of movement feel good to you. Forget about the calorie burning effect of exercise and think about how you feel after working out. Do you feel energized? Do you sleep better? If you use exercise only as a way to lose weight or eat more food, it’s not going to be something you will stick with forever.

10. Honor Your Health With Gentle Nutrition. Being healthy doesn’t mean eating perfectly. Consider how certain foods make you feel, in addition to how tasty and satisfying they are to you. One meal or one snack or one day of eating will not cause you to gain weight or have a health problem. It’s the consistency of what you eat over time – it’s not all or nothing.

alissarumsey.com/intuitive-eating/wh
at
-is-intuitive-eating/


Edited by: MINDFUL-C at: 4/14/2019 (08:18)
C

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4/13/19 7:07 A

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4/13

Exercise habit: AWESOME
Sticking to lower carb / sugar every day: Horrible

Chocolate, bread.... :(

C

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I follow the MyWW Blue Plan


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