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CTUPTON's Photo CTUPTON SparkPoints: (201,188)
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11/11/18 6:31 P

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thanks for posting about dark chocolate! I did hear that before, but forgot it.

chris

I have to be diligent about caring for myself. 100 DAYS OF WEIGHT LOSS is a great way for me to keep focused. Day 1 is July 1, 2017. Build habits to produce success. Most of these habits I have at least tried before but did not sustain. First habit: delay eating by using a timer.
LONG TERM GOAL: Reduce A1C,BP,tryglicerides,and weight.Evening Eating Sabotage Myself Frustration ..Help! www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=51755


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6/13/18 1:43 P

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www.sciencedaily.com/release
s/2018/04/
180424133628.htm


DARK CHOCOLATE....New research shows there might be health benefits to eating certain types of dark chocolate. Findings from two studies being presented today at the Experimental Biology 2018 annual meeting in San Diego show that consuming dark chocolate that has a high concentration of cacao (minimally 70% cacao, 30% organic cane sugar) has positive effects on stress levels, inflammation, mood, memory and immunity. While it is well known that cacao is a major source of flavonoids, this is the first time the effect has been studied in human subjects to determine how it can support cognitive, endocrine and cardiovascular health.

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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4/4/18 10:54 A

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Are you salad-bar savvy? Article from Mayo Clinic 3/2018
Navigating a buffet of veggies, side dishes and toppings might be harder than you think. Practice these tips when dining out.
Opting for the salad bar? It might not be healthier than ordering from the menu. Unless you make careful choices, you could unintentionally end up with a plate overflowing with calories and fat.
Don't be a victim of this common diet trap — be proactive. Before you order, peruse the salad bar and consider these points.
Go green. Lettuce or fresh spinach is generally the foundation of a healthy salad. Do the greens look fresh and plentiful?
Survey the fresh fruits and vegetables. In addition to greens, you'll want to pile on fresh vegetables and fruits, such as tomatoes, mushrooms, carrots, broccoli, cauliflowers, cucumbers, beets, radishes, bell peppers, pineapple, cantaloupe, watermelon, grapes and strawberries. Is there a good offering of these items?
Acknowledge the extras. Many people go wrong at salad bars by including too many high-fat ingredients — like cheese, chopped eggs, bacon bits, buttery croutons and pasta or potato salad. When you go through the salad bar, take only very small amounts of these items or avoid them all together. If there are too many enticing foods and you don't feel confident you can make good choices, consider healthier options from the menu rather than facing temptation from the salad bar.
Don't forget the dressings. Look for fat-free or low-fat, low-calorie dressings, such as low-fat Italian or reduced-calorie French. Other options include vinegars. You can also add flavor to your salad with lemon, herbs and peppers. Check to see if any seasonings are available.

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


 current weight: 212.0 
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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
3/21/18 10:21 P

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Another good read - Dr. Richard Jacoby's book SUGAR CRUSH encourages Plan A = Keto and Plan B=low glycemic
General guidelines :Hot buttered coffee for breakfast and Foods to avoid
Foods to eat in Sugar Crush general guidelines
Breakfast – have hot buttered coffee (sometimes called bulletproof coffee)
Put a tablespoon-sized glob of unsalted organic butter (not any other type of butter) in the bottom of your mug - Add hot coffee, let sit for 15 seconds to melt the butter, stir, and drink
If you want to avoid caffeine, decaffeinated coffee works just as well – although caffeine-sensitive people may find that when they add butter to coffee they don’t feel their normal caffeine jitters - Note you can use tea instead of coffee
Foods to AVOID with Sugar Crush general guidelines
All processed foods
Sugars : When you check ingredients label, avoid product if a sugar is in first 5 ingredients.
AVOID Natural sugars commonly described as “healthy”
AVOID Processed sugars – Sugary drinks - Fruit juice - Soda, including diet soda
Sports drinks and energy drinks - Artificial sweeteners including stevia
AVOID Soy, particularly unfermented soy – soy milk, tofu, soy infant formula, cooking oil, AVOID processed fats : Trans-fatty acids, hydrogenated oils – may be found in margarine, baked goods, and other shelf-stable goods
AVOID Fried foods – French fries, potato chips, onion rings, etc.
AVOID Cooking oils high in omega-6 fatty acids, including corn oil, soybean oil, canola oil
AVOID Dairy foods that aren’t organic, grass-fed, or raw
AVOID Wheat and gluten-containing grains
AVOID Deli meats, sausages, and bacon preserved with nitrites and nitrates
AVOID Alcohol – this is high in sugar and a burden on the liver – eliminate completely or use in moderation
Sugar Crush Plan A – Ketogenic approach
This diet is how Dr. Jacoby eats – very low to zero carbohydrates, a moderate amount of grass-fed animal protein, and a predominant amount of grass-fed fats including butter, hard and soft cheeses, and real cream.
This type of diet (low-carb/high-protein/high-fat) aren’t advised for: women who are nursing or pregnant, women with fertility complications, athletes requiring high glycolytic output, and individuals with kidney disease, hypothyroidism, or adrenal fatigue.
Nutrient guidelines for Sugar Crush Plan A
Eat at least 75% (presumably of calories) as fat
Limit carbs to under 50 grams a day
Foods to eat in Sugar Crush Plan A – primary foods to eat
Drink hot buttered coffee for breakfast as described in General guidelines above
Fats high in omega-3
Animal fats – butter, cream, ghee – any fat product from animals that eat grass
Fish oil (presumably from wild fish)
Fatty fruits – olives, coconut, avocado (presumably these are unlimited on this plan as long as you stay within the carb guidelines, although that is not clear in the book)
Oils – olive oil, coconut oil, flaxseed oil, macadamia nut oil, pumpkin seed oil, sesame seed oil, walnut oil (presumably these are unlimited on this plan, although that is not clear in the book)
Proteins from animals that eat only grass or forage
Meats, grass-fed and organic, e.g. beef, buffalo, goat, lamb, veal, venison, wild game (whether pork is allowed is unclear as it isn’t grass-fed)
Fowl/poultry, preferably free-range and organic, e.g. chicken, cornish hen, duck, goose, ostrich, pheasant, quail, turkey (thigh and leg)
Organ meats from the above meats and poultry – heart, liver, kidney, sweetbreads, pâté
Fish/seafood, wild caught e.g. abalone, anchovy, arctic char, catfish, caviar, clam, cod, crab, crayfish, flounder, grouper, haddock, halibut, herring, lobster, mackerel, mahi mahi, mussel, octopus, oyster, perch, red snapper, sablefish/black cod, salmon, sardine, scallop, scrod, shrimp, skate, sole, squid, tilapia, trout, tuna, white sea bass
Snail/escargot
Eggs, free range and organic
Dairy - Whole fat, no skim or light. Grass-fed and organic, preferably raw Eliminate pasteurized dairy products
Cream, cheese, cottage cheese, kefir, plain yogurt, sour cream (also butter, cream, ghee as fats)
Vegetables
Very low glycemic – arugula, asparagus, beet greens, bok choy, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, chard, Chinese cabbage, cucumber, endive, horseradish, lettuce, mesclun or spring mix, mushrooms, purslane, radicchio, radish, seaweeds, spinach, string beans, vegetable seed sprouts, watercress
Nuts & seeds (presumably unstarchy nuts and seeds are unlimited in Plan A – unclear)
Nuts – almond, brazil nut, cashews, macadamia nuts, pecan, pine nuts, pistachio, pumpkin, walnut
Seeds – flax seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds
Beverages - No specific guidelines – it looks like you can have water, coffee, tea
Foods to limit with Sugar Crush Plan A
Fats from a grain-fed animal
Grain-fed meat and poultry
Eggs from grain-fed poultry
Vegetables
Low glycemic – bell pepper, broccoli, broccoli rabe, brussels sprouts, cilantro, collard greens, dandelion greens, eggplant, garlic, ginger root, fennel, kale, leek, mustard greens, onion, parsley, scallion, shallot, tomato, turnip greens
Fruits
One serving a day is plenty – although to really kick your addiction you should cut it out altogether and substitute nuts, seeds, or raw vegetables
Eat fresh, raw, and slightly unripe
Foods to avoid with Sugar Crush Plan A
Foods listed under General – Foods to Avoid
Higher-carb vegetables (presumably these are avoided on plan A – unclear)
Moderate glycemic – artichoke, beet, carrot, jicama, kohlrabi, okra, peas, pumpkin, rutabaga, spaghetti squash, summer squash, turnip, yellow squash, zucchini
High glycemic – corn on the cob, parsnip, potato, sweet potato, sunchoke/Jerusalem artichoke, taro, winter squash, yam
Grains (presumably these are avoided on plan A – unclear)
Legumes (presumably these are avoided on plan A – unclear)
Milk, milk substitutes containing added sugar (e.g. rice milk, soy milk, almond milk)
Sugar Crush Plan B – Blood Sugar Regulation Diet
Portion sizes | What to eat | Foods to limit | Foods to avoid
Dr. Jacoby finds that many of his patients find Plan A different to sustain, so he asked a nutritionist, Judy Nicassio, to devise an alternate approach allowing you to taper off carbohydrates and bring your body’s chemistry back into the normal, healthful state. This diet is based on the glycemic index and adapted from food options developed by Dr. Joseph Mercola and others. It includes limited dairy and a variety of fruits and vegetables with low to moderate glycemic levels.
Portion sizes for Sugar Crush Plan B
The amount of carbohydrate is reduced over time to avoid severe withdrawals connected to your sugar addiction
Primary (green) proteins should be approximately 3-6 ounces per meal
Low-starch foods on the Primary (green) list can amount to what fits in a medium-sized bowl
Portion sizes aren’t given for fats, except a note to “include small amounts of fat”
For weeks 1-2, eat only three ˝ cup servings of the Cautionary (orange) foods (presumably per day)
For weeks 3-4, eat only two ˝ cup servings of the Cautionary (orange) foods (presumably per day)
For weeks 5-6, eat only one ˝ cup servings of the Cautionary (orange) foods (presumably per day)
After week 6, you will be consuming mostly Primary (green) foods (at least 80% of the time)
Once your blood sugars, insulin levels, weight, metabolic syndrome, etc. have stabilized, you may experiment with how often you can include “secondary foods” (orange) in your diet
For the rest of your life you will have to walk the a fine line determining the appropriate macronutrient ratios from your changing needs, and guidance from a nutritionist can be beneficial
Foods to eat in Sugar Crush Plan B – Primary foods to eat
Any food with a Glycemic Index (GI) rank below 55 (low GI) is a very good choice, and a Glycemic Load (GL) of 10 or less (low GL)
Drink hot buttered coffee for breakfast as described in General guidelines above
Proteins
Meats, preferably grass-fed and organic, e.g. beef, buffalo, goat, lamb, pork (chop), veal, venison, wild game
Fowl/poultry, preferably free-range and organic, e.g. chicken, cornish hen, duck, goose, ostrich, pheasant, quail, turkey (thigh and leg)
Organ meats from the above meats and poultry – heart, liver, kidney, sweetbreads, pâté
Bacon, ham (nitrate-free)
Fish/seafood, preferably wild caught e.g. abalone, anchovy, arctic char, catfish, caviar, clam, cod, crab, crayfish, flounder, grouper, haddock, halibut, herring, lobster, mackerel, mahi mahi, mussel, octopus, oyster, perch, red snapper, sablefish/black cod, salmon, sardine, scallop, scrod, shrimp, skate, sole, squid, tilapia, trout, tuna, white sea bass
Snail/escargot
Eggs, preferably free range and organic
Dairy, preferably raw, grass-fed and organic – cheese, cottage cheese (also butter, cream, ghee as fats)
Vegetables
Very low glycemic – arugula, asparagus, beet greens, bok choy, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, chard, Chinese cabbage, cucumber, endive, horseradish, lettuce, mesclun or spring mix, mushrooms, purslane, radicchio, radish, seaweeds, spinach, string beans, vegetable seed sprouts, watercress
Low glycemic – bell pepper, broccoli, broccoli rabe, brussels sprouts, cilantro, collard greens, dandelion greens, eggplant, garlic, ginger root, fennel, kale, leek, mustard greens, onion, parsley, scallion, shallot, tomato, turnip greens
Fats
Fatty fruits – olives, coconut, avocado
Animal fats – butter, cream, ghee
Oils – olive oil, coconut oil, flaxseed oil, macadamia nut oil, pumpkin seed oil, sesame seed oil, walnut oil
Nuts from the secondary list can be used in moderation
Beverages
No specific guidelines – it looks like you can have water, coffee, tea
Foods to limit with Sugar Crush Plan B – secondary/Cautionary foods to eat
Dairy
Whole fat, no skim or light
Eliminate pasteurized dairy products. If raw dairy is unavailable, substitute grass-fed or organic dairy
Milk
Kefir
Plain yogurt
Sour cream
Vegetables
Moderate glycemic – artichoke, beet, carrot, jicama, kohlrabi, okra, peas, pumpkin, rutabaga, spaghetti squash, summer squash, turnip, yellow squash, zucchini
High glycemic – corn on the cob, parsnip, potato, sweet potato, sunchoke/Jerusalem artichoke, taro, winter squash, yam
Legumes
Beans, dry
Lentils
Peas, dry
Fruits, moderate to high glycemic
One serving a day is plenty
Eat fresh, raw, and slightly unripe
Eat with peel or skin: apricot, apple, all berries, blueberry, blackberry, cherry, fig, grape, nectarine, peach, pear, persimmon, plum, raspberry, strawberry
Eat without peel or skin: banana, cantaloupe, cherimoya, grapefruit, kiwi, lemon, lime, mango, all melons, orange, pineapple, pomegranate, tangerine, watermelon,
Grains
Whole grains only
Amaranth, brown rice, buckwheat, corn (on the cob), millet, oat, triticale, wild rice
Note that wheat and other gluten-containing grains are to be avoided for Sugar Crush
Nuts & seeds
Unsalted
Nuts – almond, brazil nut, cashews, macadamia nuts, pecan, pine nuts, pistachio, pumpkin, walnut
Starchy nut – chestnut (unlike other nuts these are high in both fat and starch)
Seeds – flax seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds
Foods to avoid with Sugar Crush Plan B
Foods listed under General – Foods to Avoid
Health benefits claimed in Sugar Crush
The diet in this book claims to reduce the risks for: adult acne, allergies, Alzheimer’s disease, amputation, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ALS, asthma, autism, autonomic neuropathy, cancer, candidiasis, cardiovascular disease, carpal tunnel syndrome, cystitis, depression, type 2 diabetes, dry skin, fatigue, food addiction, foot ulcers, gallbladder disease, gangrene, headaches, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high triglycerides, hyperglycemia, inflammation, insulin resistance, inflammatory bowel disease IBD, irritable bowel syndrome IBS, metabolic syndrome, migraine, multiple sclerosis MS, nerve damage, pain, peripheral neuropathy, plantar fasciitis, prediabetes, reflux disease, restless leg syndrome RLS, runny nose, sinusitis, stroke, syndrome X, urinary tract infections UTI, wrinkles
Chewfo received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for this review, and was not required to write a positive review.
As always, this is not intended to be a replacement for professional medical diagnosis or treatment for a medical condition. Consult your doctor before starting a new diet. This page describes what the authors of the diet recommend – Chewfo is describing the diet only, not endorsing it.
The book’s website is http://sugarcrushthebook.com, and it’s on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/sugarcrushbook. Also see Dr. Jacoby’s YouTube channel for videos on how diabetes affects your feet.
Get a copy of Sugar Crush for detailed explanations of why sugar damages your health, the phases of peripheral neuropathy / nerve damage, treatment options to help with the pain, how to cope with sugar cravings, deciphering food labels, travel and restaurant tips.

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
2/28/18 8:58 P

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Another food pyramid - Not sure how I feel about this but just sharing info
Healthy Weight Pyramid From Mayo Clinic Newsletter 2/2018
Use the pyramid as a cheat sheet for your general eating guidelines.

Let the Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid be your guide to making smart eating choices. It's pretty simple to use. The goal is to choose most of your food from the groups at the base of the pyramid and less from the top — and to move more.
Sweets
This group includes candies, cakes, cookies, pies, doughnuts and other desserts, as well as table sugar. With sweets, keep it small; most are high in calories and fat without any nutrients.
The pyramid recommends limiting sweets to 75 calories a day. This isn't much. So consider thinking of your sweet calories over the course of a week. If you give in to the brownie on Monday, hold off on any more sweets until the weekend — or even longer.
Fats
Your body needs small amounts of certain types of fats to function well, but saturated fats and trans fats increase your risk of heart disease. Focus on good fats, such as olive oil, avocado, nuts, nut butters and more.
Protein/Dairy
The best choices are low in fat and calories, such as fish, skinless white-meat poultry, fat-free dairy foods, egg whites and legumes (lentils, beans and peas) — which also happen to be good sources of fiber.
Carbohydrates
Most foods in this group are grains or made from grains. Whole grains are best; they're higher in fiber and other nutrients. Some examples include whole-grain cereal, whole-wheat bread, whole-wheat pasta, oatmeal and brown rice. Look for the term "whole" as one of the first ingredients on the label.
Vegetables
They're rich in nutrients and fiber, and most are low in calories and fat. Focus on fresh vegetables; frozen or canned without added fat or salt are also OK. And try for more dark green, red and orange varieties. Note that starchy, higher calorie veggies such as corn and potatoes count as carbohydrates when following the pyramid.
Fruits
Almost all fruits fit into a healthy diet. But whole fresh, frozen and canned fruits without added sugar are the best choices. They're filling and packed with nutrients and fiber. Limit fruit juices and dried fruits; they have more calories and are less filling.
Find your daily calorie goal
The Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid can help you learn to manage your calories and still feel full.
The chart below shows average calorie levels needed for healthy weight loss, based on sex and current weight. You can adjust this goal as you go along. For example, you might consider adding more calories if you are very active and you are losing more than a pound or two a week.
Weight Calorie goals
Pounds Women Men
250 or less 1,200 1,400
251-300 1,400 1,600
301 or more 1,600 1,800
Know your serving goals
With your daily calorie goal in hand, find the number of servings from each food group you should eat each day to meet your goal. You can eat as many vegetables and fruits as you like — they're low in calories and packed with nutrition.
Food group Daily caloric goals
1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 2,000
Vegetables 4 or more 4 or more 5 or more 5 or more 5 or more
Fruits 3 or more 4 or more 5 or more 5 or more 5 or more
Carbohydrates 4 5 6 7 8
Protein/Dairy 3 4 5 6 7
Fats 3 3 3 4 5

Fitness
As you can see, The Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid is not just about food. At the center of the pyramid is a circle that recognizes the important role physical activity plays in weight loss and health. The pyramid recommends 30 to 60 minutes of moderately vigorous physical activity on most days of the week.

Edited by: LINDAF49 at: 2/28/2018 (21:00)
Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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AURA18's Photo AURA18 Posts: 11,090
1/10/18 8:04 A

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Thanks Linda, Great info I want to learn more about
Wahls Paleo Plus (increase fat, reduce meat, reduce to 6 cups veggies per day, eliminate all grains and legumes) It is like the plan I am doing now. I have to pay attention to lectins that cause leaky gut last summer. Corrected by avoiding nightshades, grains and legumes.

Maribeth MN CT Black Panthers draxe.com/ dance u.nu/ixjy planks u.nu/9w-u hands u.nu/httpsunu7lag
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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
1/7/18 9:44 P

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Wahls Protocul summary:
The Wahls Levels
Three levels make up the Wahls diet; whether to do them sequentially or to cold-turkey it (Paleo Plus baby!) is user's choice. This choice, like with any other radical lifestyle change, often depends on the severity of suffering and willingness to crack the whip (on oneself of course). Before we go into levels, lets bullet out the basic dietary tenets of Wahls:
three cups GREENS
three cups COLORS
three cups SULFUR-RICH
NO added sugar
NO dairy
NO gluten!
NO eggs
NO processed/microwaved/irradiated food
NO vegetable oil (except un-heated olive oil)
moderate FRUIT
moderate GF GRAINS/LEGUMES/STARCHES
highest quality meat and vegetables: grass-fed, organic, wild-caught
Pretty basic right? Kidding, I'm not that pretentious...this is major! This is life changing! Alas, this post is about informing, not soap-boxing. So, add all the above rules to the level of choice, as seen below:
Wahls Diet (above rules only)
Wahls Paleo (further limit grains/legumes, add fermented foods/nuts/seeds, animal protein everyday, add seaweed and organ meat)
Wahls Paleo Plus (increase fat, reduce meat, reduce to 6 cups veggies per day, eliminate all grains and legumes)
A newly minted Paleo subscriber might feel a bit confused at the final level; Paleo Plus. What' the rationale here? In a word: ketosis. Dr. Wahls believes that in order to derive maximum benefit from a low-carb diet, one must get the body to run on fat, rather than sugar (carbs!). In the spirit of fast-facts, let's leave it here: nutritional ketosis (fat as fuel) benefits brain health, reduces inflammation, and regulates blood sugar- jumpstarting the body-wide healing process. Wahls ketosis is particularly dynamic in that nutrient density remains high (traditional ketosis diets rely heavily on supplementation) because we keep our veg intake at 6 cups.
There we have it, the simplest Wahls breakdown I could muster. Note that this post did not go into the other lifestyle changes, as listed above, nor did we expound on the fantastic supplement regimens in the book- comment below if you would like more Wahls exploration!

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


 current weight: 212.0 
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AURA18's Photo AURA18 Posts: 11,090
12/23/17 8:00 P

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I am reading Dr. Gundry's Plant Paradox and using the "Yes/No lists" to plan nutrition
I'll come back after the holiday to see if you would like to share info on Low Lectin.

Since 1.27.16 lost 80 sofar with low carb. I did not eat many lectin foods till I tried to go all vegan and ate a lot of beans last Spring. Don't like beans and can easily omit. I write on my page everyday to keep track of foods that are good for my digestion & overall health.

I really want to lose more & manage symptoms of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis
Started in Sept. and getting better at sticking to lists about 80%.
gundrymd.com/plant-paradox-shopping-
li
st/


Edited by: AURA18 at: 1/2/2018 (19:28)
Maribeth MN CT Black Panthers draxe.com/ dance u.nu/ixjy planks u.nu/9w-u hands u.nu/httpsunu7lag
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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
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Struggled to understand about lectins today and just going to share the article I read and re-read and underlined and highlighted and am still thinking and digesting it.
Dr. Gundry: Lectins are the Root Cause of Inflammation and Disease https://youtu.be/luna9RQsL1E
Lectins bind to carbohydrates and attach to cells that allow them to do harm, as part of the plant’s self-defense mechanism against pests. Unfortunately, some may also cause trouble in humans
Many lectins are proinflammatory, immunotoxic, neurotoxic and cytotoxic. Certain lectins may also increase blood viscosity, interfere with gene expression and disrupt endocrine function
Among the most problematic lectin-containing foods are wheat and other seeds of the grass family, beans, soy and other legumes, and members of the nightshade family such as eggplants, potatoes, tomatoes and peppers
While whole foods are healthy, there are certain caveats to consider even here. Lectins (not to be confused with the phospholipid lecithin) are carbohydrate-binding proteins that are widespread in the plant kingdom. An estimated 30 percent of fresh foods contain lectins.
Even dairy contains lectins. Grass fed butter is an exception. Grass fed milk is also lower in lectins than grain-fed milk, thanks to higher amounts of SlgA, an immunoglobulin that binds to lectins. Lectins get their name from the Latin word legere, from which the word “select” derives — and that is exactly what they do: They select (attach to) specific biological structures that allow them to do harm, as part of the plant’s self-defense mechanism.
It’s nature’s ingenious way of keeping natural enemies like fungi and insects at bay. Unfortunately, some of these glycoproteins may also cause trouble in humans.
The Plant Paradox Dr. Steven Gundry’s newly released book, “The Plant Paradox: The Hidden Dangers in ‘Healthy’ Foods That Cause Disease and Weight Gain” has gained widespread media attention, reigniting the discussion — and concern — about lectins.3,4 Gundry has also completed a human study on lectins. In the Selfhacked interview above, he discusses some of his findings, and the reasoning behind his lectin avoidance diet.
Many are now familiar with the problems of gluten, but lectins could potentially be just as problematic. That’s not to say the issue lacks controversy. There’s plenty of that to go around. Still, I believe the issue of lectins — toxic lectins, to be more exact — in the diet warrants a closer look.
While Gundry goes so far as to declare lectins the greatest danger in the American diet, especially for those with autoimmune disease, the reality is likely to be far different. Authority Nutrition6,7 points out that lectins in small amounts can actually provide valuable health benefits, including immune and inflammation modulation, and that problems will only arise when you’re getting high amounts of them.
Indeed, I believe it would be a mistake to assume all lectins are bad for you. For example, avocados contain the lectin agglutinin (persea Americana agglutinin),8 but that hardly places them on the list of foods to avoid! Avocados are among the healthiest foods I can think of, and research9 shows the agglutinin found in avocado is devoid of specificity for carbs. It interacts with proteins and polyamino acids instead.
Beans, on the other hand, not only contain lectins that can cause problems for many people, they also have the added drawback of being high in net carbs, and are therefore best avoided in the initial transitional stages of a ketogenic diet. So, there are pros and cons to consider, depending on the food in question. The presence of lectin is by no means a sole determinant. That said, certain lectins have more potent toxic or allergenic effects,10 and the lectins found in beans fall into this category.
Lectins and Their Harmful Effects
Among the most problematic lectin-containing foods11,12 are wheat and other seeds of the grass family,13 beans, soy and other legumes, peanuts, and members of the nightshade family14 such as eggplants, potatoes, tomatoes and peppers.
Grains and legumes such as black beans, soybeans, lima beans, kidney beans and lentils contain the highest amounts. Generally speaking, lectins are a type of glyca-binding protein, meaning proteins that bind to carbohydrates in your body. There are many types of lectins, and the main difference between them is the type of sugar each prefers and binds to in your body.
As noted by Dave Asprey, founder of Bulletproof.com,15 “One of the reasons wheat is so bad for you is that the lectin in wheat is attracted to glucosamine, the polysaccharide that covers your joints.” Some — including wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), found in wheat and other grass-family seeds — bind to specific receptor sites on your intestinal mucosal cells and interfere with the absorption of nutrients across your intestinal wall.
As such, they act as “antinutrients,” and can have a detrimental effect on your gut microbiome by shifting the balance of your bacterial flora — a common precursor to leaky gut.
Lectins Are Highly Inflammatory
One major concern is that most lectins are proinflammatory, meaning they trigger inflammation and create advanced glycation end products. C-reactive protein (CRP) is one example of the many lectins you have circulating in your body right now, and it’s used as a marker of inflammation.
They are also immunotoxic (capable of stimulating a hyperimmune response), neurotoxic and cytotoxic, meaning they’re toxic to cells and may induce apoptosis (cell death). Certain lectins may also increase your blood viscosity by binding to your red blood cells.
This makes the blood cells sticky, resulting in abnormal clotting. Some lectins (such as WGA) may even interfere with gene expression and disrupt endocrine function. Lectins also promote leptin resistance, thereby increasing your risk of obesity. All of these factors can predispose you to disease.
Who Should Avoid Beans and Other Lectin-Rich Foods?
People who may need to be particularly careful with lectin-containing foods — specifically those in the nightshade family, all grains, legumes and beans — include those struggling with inflammatory or autoimmune conditions,16,17 including but not limited to:
Thyroid dysfunction (especially Hashimoto’s thyroiditis)
Arthritis
Diabetes
Heart disease
Overweight
Caution may also be warranted if you’re taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, as they’ve been shown to increase gut permeability.18 This allows toxic lectins to enter your bloodstream, thereby raising your risk of experiencing an adverse reaction.
Avoid Beans During Initial Stage of Ketogenic Diet
Foods high in both net carbs (total carbohydrates minus fiber) and lectins deliver double the harm, and this includes grains and beans. In fact, I recommend abstaining from both grains and beans during the initial stages of my metabolic mitochondrial therapy (MMT) program, which involves cyclical nutritional ketosis, detailed in my new book, “Fat for Fuel.”
Once you’re through the initial stage where strictly limiting net carbs is crucial, and your body is efficiently burning fat for fuel, then beans (and other net carbs such as grains) can be reincorporated, especially during your “feasting” days. Feast-and-famine cycling or pulsing is an important component of the MMT program. This simply means you cycle in and out of nutritional ketosis rather than staying in ketosis indefinitely.
Initially, you limit your intake of net carbs to 40 or 50 grams per day and replace them with healthy fats. This will transition your body into primarily burning fat for fuel and radically reduce your risk for most chronic diseases. If your insulin level is below 3, then your carbohydrate consumption may be ideal for you even if it’s higher than 40 or 50 grams. However, if your insulin level is higher, then you are best advised to scale back net carbs from your diet.
The higher your insulin levels are, the fewer carbohydrates you should eat. Unless your fasting insulin is below 5, avoid carbs like beans, legumes and grains such as rice, quinoa and oats in this initial phase. These foods not only drive your insulin levels up but also increase your chances of becoming leptin resistant, which interferes with your ability to lose weight.
Once your body is burning fat for fuel, you then begin cycling in and out of ketosis. As a general rule, I recommend increasing your net carbs and protein one or two days a week — days on which you can go as high as 100 grams or more of net carbs — and then cycling back into ketosis on the remaining five or six days. During these high-carb days, beans are acceptable if you like them. Just be sure to cook them properly to neutralize most of the lectins.
Why Beans Must Be Carefully Cooked
Red kidney beans contain the highest amounts of the toxic lectin phytohaemagglutinin. Many other beans also contain it, albeit in lower amounts, including white kidney beans and Greek butter beans. This lectin is why you should never eat beans raw or undercooked, lest you come down with bloody vomiting and other symptoms reminiscent of severe food poisoning. As few as five undercooked beans can cause severe symptoms.
Cooking at high heat deactivates this lectin, making the beans safe to eat. Research has shown cooked red kidney beans contain only 200 to 400 hemagglutinating units (hau), compared to the 20,000 to 70,000 hau found in the raw beans. While most people would never consider eating dry beans without cooking them, skipping steps or undercooking them are common kitchen faux pas that send many to the hospital. As noted in The Atlantic:19
“Stories of lectin poisoning are not especially rare. In ‘The Independent’20 the food writer Vicky Jones describes a dinner party in which she used Greek butter beans in a dish without boiling them first. Soon everyone was violently ill. It came on so quickly that before they could consider going to the emergency room, death seemed preferable to [trekking to the] hospital. Jones recovered fully, as most lectin-poisoned people do.”
General Cooking Recommendations and Other Lectin-Reducing Strategies
Here are some general preparation and cooking guidelines to reduce toxic lectins in beans:
•Soak the beans in water for at least 12 hours before cooking, frequently changing the water. Adding baking soda to the soaking water will boost the neutralization of lectins even further21
•Rinse the beans and discard the water used for soaking
•Cook for at least 15 minutes on HIGH heat. Cooking beans on too-low a heat can actually increase toxicity levels up to five times or more.22 Avoid any recipe calling for dry bean flour, as the dry heat of your oven will not efficiently destroy the lectins
•The best way to destroy lectins is to use a pressure cooker.23,24,25 Many swear by the InstaPot,26 a multipurpose pressure cooker. Avoid slow cookers, as they will actually increase lectin content due to the low temperature used. Pressure cooking may also preserve more nutrients than other cooking methods
Sprouting and fermenting will also dramatically reduce the lectin content of foods that contain it, making them far safer. This is one of the reasons why traditionally sprouted grain bread is easier on your digestion than conventional bread made with processed, unsprouted grains.



Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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Nutmeg For Insomnia And Sleep Deprivation
Nutmeg is a great natural cure for both insomnia and sleep deprivation. It is a rich source of myristicin, a natural organic compound that inhibits the release of enzymes that cause stress. (7) Since stress is one of the many factors that play a role in insomnia, this makes nutmeg effective at making sure one has a more peaceful sleep. 
Nutmeg has also been shown to be a powerful sedative, which means in can help in both cases of insomnia in sleep deprivation. For people with insomnia that have trouble initially falling asleep, nutmeg can help speed up the process. For people who have sleep deprivation due to outside factors, nutmeg can help one fall asleep through them. 

We recommend mixing one-quarter of a teaspoon of nutmeg powder with one cup of water and drinking it an hour before going to bed. Nutmeg should only be taken in moderation (start with a small pinch), since nutmeg has been linked to hallucinations and even toxicity in high measurements. You should never exceed 1/4 teaspoon and only take nutmeg under the supervision of your doctor.
Let us know if nutmeg helped you combat a lack of sleep in the comments below.
Please note that this is not recommended for children due to potential toxicity although it is rare it still would not be advised.  Nor do we recommended a regular dose of nutmeg for pregnant women. www.healthy-holistic-living.com/reli
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e-insomnia-naturally.html?t=HHL


Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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9/11/17 1:33 A

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A new member referenced Dr Steve Gundry - a cardiologist with diet specific for anti-inflammatory goals so I did some exploring... have lots of questions but also learning and that is good. Biggest hurtles to overcome it seems to me would be the forever battle with sugars - but in the initial phase of his diet t least he does not allow any honey, maple syrup or any fruits at all - not even berries!!! OUCH!!! and includes no avocado since they are technically a fruit! I hope others will read and weigh in also - I was a little reluctant to even write this since I have not read further into the plan and it may relax a bit after first couple of weeks.. Will let you know as I read and learn..

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
8/12/17 11:19 P

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I have been suspicious that nightshades might be causing Fibromyalgia/arthritis flares for me so found this interesting:
Beware of Nightshades November 6, 2010 By Jane Barthelemy.
Do you suffer from gluten or dairy intolerance, mood swings, indigestion, arthritis, or an auto-immune disease? If so, the hidden culprit could be nightshades. Nightshades are a group of vegetables in the Solanaceae family including Tomatoes, White Potatoes, all Peppers, and Eggplant. Many people are intolerant to nightshades, especially Caucasians, but the results are often delayed weeks, months, or years, making them difficult connect to the true cause. Other symptoms of nightshade intolerance are depression, anxiety, constipation, fibromyalgia, osteoporosis, joint pain, headaches, nausea, bloating, flatulence, IBS, anemia, and poor food absorption. Symptoms of nightshade intolerance often overlap with those of gluten or dairy intolerance.
How Can I Avoid Nightshade Foods? This can be challenging, since they seem to be in everything. I suggest you don’t go crazy. Start simply by limiting your intake of nightshades rather than trying to go 100% nightshade-free. Know your recipes and read labels in prepared foods. Stop buying tomatoes, peppers, potatoes and eggplants. Focus on the foods you CAN eat rather than what you’re missing. You can eat every recipe on this website! Make smart substitutions like mashed cauliflower for mashed potatoes. Avoid obvious nightshade foods like potato chips, pizza, pasta sauce, ratatouille, salsa, hot peppers, and cayenne. You may receive a double benefit: Not only will your intestines begin to heal, you’ll also enjoy better nutrition. That’s because home-cooking is way healthier than fast food and eating out in restaurants.
The more nightshades you consume, the greater the risk of leaky gut. If you suspect this sensitivity may be your issue, consider removing nightshades from your diet for a period of time, and observe how you feel. Then try re-introducing them to your diet. If your condition gets worse, that’s a pretty good indication that nightshades may not be part of your healthiest lifelong diet. It may take several months for your intestinal wall to repair and for your body to fully respond. The best advice is to listen to your own body.
Who should avoid nightshades? Anyone wishing to optimize digestive health, and people suffering from autoimmune diseases or allergies would be well advised to eliminate or drastically reduce consumption of potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants. Your digestion is unique. Since digestion is a highly individual function, some people may be more affected by nightshades than others. Nightshades are toxic to dogs, cats and horses.
What diseases have been linked to nightshades? There is increasing evidence that gluten intolerance and many autoimmune diseases are linked to a leaky gut, which allows microbes and toxins to enter the blood stream to compromise the immune system. Specific auto-immune diseases that may be affected by nightshades include Arthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Type 1 Diabetes, Crohn’s disease, Grave’s disease, Celiac disease, Multiple sclerosis, Hashimoto’s disease, and Lupus.
Nightshade sensitivity appears to be genetic. Nightshades came from the New World, and these foods were unknown in Europe and Asia until well after the “discovery” of America in 1492. They entered the mainstream North American diet around 1800. Three hundred years is a very short time span in human biological evolution. If you’re of white Anglo-Saxon heritage, nightshades are a very recent addition to your diet, and they’re more likely to cause problems. However if you’re an indigenous American, your ancestors may have been eating nightshades for centuries, so chances are slim you’ll be sensitive.
Nightshades and glutinous grains have a lot in common. They all contain anti-nutrients, natural compounds which resist digestion and cause intestinal perforation. What are antinutrients? They are natural chemicals in seeds, such as lectins, saponins, enzyme blockers, trypsin, and phytic acid. They may taste slightly bitter and often cause intestinal permeability or poor nutrient absorption. Mother Nature has done her job well, ensuring that seeds pass straight though the body undigested, in order to be planted in the ground. Most grains, nuts, and seeds—including wheat, corn and rice—the world’s primary foods—contain natural antinutrients that impede digestion.
How do Nightshades cause problems? Dr. Loren Cordain, professor and author of “The Paleo Diet”, says that the anti-nutrients in nightshades can interfere with human digestion causing intestinal permeability, or “leaky gut”. This leaves unprotected holes in the intestinal lining, an open invitation to many of our modern auto-immune diseases.
Nightshades contain two primary toxins: Saponins and Lectins. Both of these chemicals play a major role in increasing intestinal permeability, laying the groundwork for a variety of modern conditions.
Saponins are natural chemicals in some plants that can impair health by creating holes in the intestinal lining. A perforated intestine is vulnerable to any microbes and toxins that may enter the bloodstream. Foods high in saponins are potato skins and potato chips with the skins. Ripe tomatoes have low levels of toxic saponins. However green tomatoes and “hot house” tomatoes, or those that are harvested before they are ripe, are exceedingly high in these toxins. Peppers are high in saponins, such as Bell peppers, Cayenne pepper, Chipotle, Chili pepper, Paprika, Jalapeno pepper, Pimento, Serrano pepper, Ancho, Habanero, and Tabasco.
Lectins are natural proteins in plants that are cell code breakers. Our cell walls are covered with chemical receptors to protect and ensure entry of only the right compounds. Lectins can crack the codes and trick the cell into doing things it normally would not do. Lectins can bypass our defenses, “getting behind the lines” to travel all over the body. Lectins can penetrate the protective mucus of the small intestine, promoting cell division at the wrong time, and even causing cell death. Lectins can perforate the intestinal wall, or trick the immune system to thinking there’s an intruder, causing an allergic reaction.
Lectins and Saponins act like a Trojan Horse intruder into the intestines, exposing the body to microbes and toxins that would normally be immediately destroyed by a healthy immune system.
This is a summary of three articles by Dr. Loren Cordain, professor and author of “The Paleo Diet”. Find Dr. Cordain’s complete articles here: #1 Potatoes, #2 Tomatoes, #3 Peppers.
Read my article: Are Nightshades Paleo?


Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
6/6/17 11:35 P

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This seems a little simpler to me - I really appreciate the writings of Dr Jockers on facebook and emails - good graphics and explainations and YouTubes too!



Sorry it is hard to read - The picture in my files is a lot bigger but gets lost in the transfers to this page --- Will see what I can do about that in the next few days

I do not sell or use his products - hope you can look beyond the commercial stuff and see his good medical writings www.facebook.com/DrDavidJock
ers/?ref=b
r_rs


Edited by: LINDAF49 at: 6/6/2017 (23:44)
Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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6/19/16 6:50 A

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With the Tart Cherries you could add to a health shake mixed with other ingredients they may be more palatable if that is the right term!

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I am going to use the Zone Anti-Inflammatory Diet meal planning web site I just subscribed to plan just my dinners for my first week of the diet. I am starting small until I get the hang of it. The web site allows for planning three regular meals as well as several snack meals a day all to meet your both the Zone specific Carbs, Protein and Fat ratios and your calorie needs for as many days ahead as you pick and prepares a shopping list. You either plan the meals your self or have the site make a plan. If you don't like the sites meal choice you can click a button adjacent that meal to list possible substitutions to stay in the general Zone dietary plan. The site allows you to plan a single meal for more then one then suggests the portions according to individual calorie requirements. Eventually you supposed to be able to train the site to select from among favorite foods or to pick similar meals. I don't know how this will work out but I am game. Visit my new "Zone-Diet team to follow me as I share the meal plans.


I'm Bob. I am retired and live in Virginia, USA (EDT) with my wife.Please visit my Blog at www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_jo
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I got our vitamin/supplement order and started DH on 2000 morning and evening for his asthma in particular and will keep mine at 1000 in the morning and 2000 in evening until the 1000 tabs are all used up then go to 2000 each...I don;t feel an urgency to take large dose and often deal better if I "build up doses in new adventures...seems to affect my firbo less.

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
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Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LITTLEWIND53's Photo LITTLEWIND53 Posts: 21,517
12/12/12 3:20 A

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Linda, Sweet cherries I have no problem with, and this IS the problem......

I agree with your post on Vit D deficiency...... It also plays a role in Type 2 Diabetes.....

The last doc I saw, had me on 1000 IU a day, then upped to 2000, then 5000, and when I was really sick with Pnemonia (sp) he told me to double that for 10 days...... Then I was back down to 5000 IU daily.

The doc I see now reduced that to 2000 IU, and even at that level I was barely above the "deficient" threash hold. But he lowered it again to 1000 iU. As I was at the border on 2000 daily, I ignored his order and continue to take 2000 daily...... I guess next time I go in he will order the test again as he usually does every second visit. We shall see if it is still above the line or if it continues to fall......

I am supposed to take a daily low dose asprin as well as the Vit D..... I wish it was covered by my medical. Sadly, it is not but I still need to take them daily.....

Linda

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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
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12.12.11 Dr. Lee Hieb Vit. D deficiency = rickets, a bone disorder; increases of multiple sclerosis, colon cancer and depression;
Low Vit D leads to cardiac arrhythmia, breast cancer, adult fractures, dementia, heart attack risk and even diabetes.
Higher levels of Vitamin D improve longevity and preventing influenza – even better than vaccination…
Heart muscle does not contract well unless adequate Vitamin D is present.
Supplementing 10,000 iu a day of Vitamin D3 has been shown to have no adverse effects. D3 supplementation is cheap.
D.Hieb takes 10,000 u Vit D3/day x 7 yrs, levels of 55 ng/dl & recommends the same to all
To be a scientific leader in this new world order is to be wrong.
Science requires freedom to consider the alternatives, and in medicine, the freedom to make our own choices – not have government bureaucrats or the Institute of Medicine make them for us

Littlewind Linda, I smiled when I read your reply about not being able to get cherries down "as Medicine" I am blessed that I can get most things down..cooked spinach and asperagus still cause me to "Lose it all" but most things I can force down the hatch if I feel a real need to do so.i

Edited by: LINDAF49 at: 12/11/2012 (23:03)
Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LITTLEWIND53's Photo LITTLEWIND53 Posts: 21,517
11/29/12 6:49 P

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Good for you on keeping the inflamation in check.

As for thinking of tart cherries being "medicine" I don't know if that would work for me, If I can't get it past my nose (such as yoghurt), or texture (as in broccoli or green beans) or tastebuds (tart cherries) , I simply cannot force it down. I would be throwing it up faster than I could swallow..... I have been this way for almost 60 years and I have not been able to get beyond this crazy hang up I have......

Linda

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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
11/29/12 6:15 P

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To me "tart cherries" refers to pie cherries and you can occasionally find them canned up above other canned fruit in our stores here...but they are not a food i want to eat 'as is' and to sweeten them up enough to enjoy seems to defeat the purpose so i will forego that except for occasional in season or maybe will cann some of my own next year for juice only---I could get down a small serving if I think of it as medicine, not an enjoyable fruit! haha

I seem in a cooking rut for daily meals lately but ewill continue to learn what I can and eat within our means and my calorie limit...I have ut on a few pounds as the winter comes in and i decrease my activity level. but the inflammation seems in good control the last few days so I am thankful and very content.

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LITTLEWIND53's Photo LITTLEWIND53 Posts: 21,517
10/1/12 4:26 P

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Because I don't get out much anymore, I don't know of any sources for "tart" cherries. My local gorcery store brings them in at thier peak growing season but they do seem to be sweet, not tart.....

I love to just eat cherries right from the fridge, just wash and serve. I don't know how I would react to tart ones....

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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
9/24/12 4:59 P

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Tart cherries have the “highest anti-inflammatory content of any food” ...read this article then lost it and forgot to keep the credintial...I have read this before though and wonder how we eat tart cherries without so much sugar that it would nulify the benifit??? Does any one "just do it" ...take 'em like medicine and just get 'em down? Not sure I am that dedicated yet!



Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LITTLEWIND53's Photo LITTLEWIND53 Posts: 21,517
9/21/12 9:35 P

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If bought the seeds, but never actually grew any myself. My sister grows them pretty much all winter.

Just soak, drain, and keep in a dark warm place until the seeds start to sprout. She usually has them at an angle (not totally upright, but almost) so that the seeds don't soak in water and get mouldy. She has a tupperware container to hold the glass jar in place, then covers with a dish rag and leaves on the kitchen counter. Check them daily, and I can't actually remember if she adds more water and drains daily or not.....

When the seeds have sprouted, she puts into the fridge, and uses straight from there.....

Now that I am in an apartment of my own again, I am hoping I will be able to try it for myself this winter.....

Linda

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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
9/21/12 2:17 P

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...and if you grow your own...how do you do it?
I have one of those cute tripple layer things but have never succeedied in using it...
I think with cooler weather and no more Farmer's markets, I will try it again when we get back from vacation....

Edited by: LINDAF49 at: 9/24/2012 (16:57)
Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
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LITTLEWIND53's Photo LITTLEWIND53 Posts: 21,517
9/19/12 3:35 P

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Yes, and I will actually eat a broccoli sprout where I don't eat the actual plant.....

Add to salad greensor soups and stews just before serving, use instead of lettuce on sandwiches (we all know that ice burg lettuce may look good on a sandwich but has very little nutritional value, right????)

Who uses sprouts and how do you use them?

Linda

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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
9/19/12 1:18 P

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Eat a sprout you are eating a tiny, easy-to-digest plant that is at its peak of nutritional value. It releases all of its stored nutrients in a burst of vitality as it attempts to become a full-sized plant. you literally get the best of what a seed has to offer in terms of nutrition.

Grapefruit for cholesterol:Grapefruits contain a unique type of soluble fiber called galacturonic acid, that not only helps lower 'bad' cholesterol, but may help dissolve or reverse plaque already clogging your arteries.


Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
9/2/12 4:46 P

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Mustard...Did you know that mustard has health benefits? Mustard seeds have high antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties in them, as well as helping speed up the metabolism, lower blood pressure, and prevent atherosclerosis. They also help the digestive system and even help with reducing migraines. These little seeds pack a lot of benefits and having them in your diet more often will help your body. Plus making mustard from scratch is an easy process. So instead of grabbing the ketchup, put some mustard on your sandwich next time around!

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


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LITTLEWIND53's Photo LITTLEWIND53 Posts: 21,517
9/2/12 11:56 A

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Here it is as a live link.

www.care2.com/greenliving/wonder-nut
-w
alnut.html#ixzz25HIwCfkP


I find walnuts on the bitter side. I want to try to make some nut milk such as almond milk, and was wondering if walnut milk would work? Would it be bitter like the walnut?

When I was still working I used to weight out 1 ounce of nuts and put in a zip lock bag to take as my snacks at work. I used almond, walnut or cashew. and loved them.

Linda

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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 Posts: 13,641
9/1/12 11:17 P

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Walnuts...Just seven of them a day can keep you free of many health problems.
1. Whole, unskinned walnuts are rich in phenol, antioxidant properties are known to boost immunity and delay aging.
2. Contain almost twice as many antioxidant polyphenols as Brazil nuts, almonds, peanuts, pistachios, macadamias, hazelnuts, cashews and pecans.
3. The omega-3 essential fatty acids in walnuts improve your blood lipid profile, protecting you from strokes and coronary disease.
4. Walnuts have a special kind of Vitamin E, which further protects the heart.
5. The high-quality protein in walnuts can substitute for meat.
6. Effective against certain cancers, especially prostate and breast cancer.
7. Ayurvedic healers recommend giving one walnut a day to growing children, because the nut is known to nourish the brain. Modern research has corroborated this
8. Eaten in moderation—7 walnuts a day—they calm the Kapha dosha, which means you have more energy and fewer colds, among other things.
9. Studies have shown that walnuts are beneficial for those with Type 2 diabetes.
10.Contain melatonin, an antioxidant that regulates sleep.
Why only 7, you ask? That’s because 7 walnuts make 1 ounce, and that ounce of protection is all you need to keep the doctor away!)
Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/wonder-nu
t-walnut.html#ixzz25HIwCfkP

Linda in WA state ***John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life, an abundant life!
*Gluten free, Heart Healthy, Anti-inflammatory, Diabetic Low Carb way of eating and life structure
Jan 1 2020 immediate goal of 199.5# = ONEderland Long term goal of 160#


 current weight: 212.0 
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