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EDWARDS1411's Photo EDWARDS1411 SparkPoints: (1,104,079)
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1/18/14 9:42 A

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(#6 Be A Mind-Bender)

www.mindfuleating.org/MindfulEating.
ht
ml
tells us that
Mindfulness is simply the moment-by-moment awareness of life. But it’s not always so simple. We so easily get caught up in our own thoughts and self-talk that we are scarcely aware of life as it passes us by. This is very true of our eating. We eat meal after meal, snack after snack, barely aware of what we’re eating and how much we’re consuming.

Mindfulness is a return to paying attention to life. When we pay attention to our food---really pay attention---we begin to notice all sorts of wonderful aspects of the food, and we become aware of how much we’re putting into our bodies.

www.webmd.com/diet/features/mindfuln
es
s-helps-healthy-lifestyle
suggests that mindfulness could be the key to weight loss success and gives us six ways to help. Here's the last one

#6 Be a Mind-Bender

Ever splurged on a piece of pie and thought, “Why bother working out now? I already blew it for the day.” If so, it’s time to stop!

Once you’re aware of this kind of self-defeating thought, you can replace it with a more positive one: "I’m human. I slipped up and had pie. Now what can I do now to get back on track?"

"This new thought can put you back on track toward the gym, and at the very least, it’s a way to show more compassion for yourself,” says Sofia Rydin-Gray, PhD, director of health psychology at Duke Diet and Fitness Center.

This tip really speaks for itself. We get in more trouble when we start beating ourselves up for "indulging" or "giving in" to a "forbidden" food. This self-defeatist thinking builds and the next thing you know your good intentions of eating healthy for the day are gone. Instead, realize that it is done, it's over....blow it off and forget about it. Putting any more energy into beating yourself up is detrimental to your mental status. I'm a firm believer that no food should be completely off limits - moderation and portion control are the keys here. Our food plans should not be "diets" but "live=its" and besides "Every meal is an opportunity for a fresh start."

Having said that,

www.tops123.com/Montana/Cravings.pdf shares a group of strategies called the “5 Ds” can help you “surf the urge” when you feel a craving coming on!

DELAY…giving into it for 15 minutes. As mentioned above, often the craving will subside. If not, move on to the next strategy.

DISTRACT…yourself from thinking about the food you crave by getting involved in an activity that requires concentration and that is not compatible with eating. Phone a friend, take a bath, clean your house or anything that works for you. If this does not work, move on to the next strategy.

DISTANCE…yourself from the food you crave. Take a stroll, walk the dog, go to the store (not food). Find a way to move away from the source of temptation. If you still feel tempted, try the next strategy.

DETERMINE…how strong your craving is. How strong is your desire to eat the food in question? It is a good practice to rate your cravings on a scale of 1 to 10. If a craving is very strong (10), you may want to give in. If you determine you are going to have some of the food you crave, the next question is, how much?

DECIDE…what amount of food is reasonable and appropriate. Put a reasonable portion on a plate and return the rest. It’s important not to feel defeated if you occasionally give in to a craving.

And some more tips to avoid cravings are:

- Don’t starve yourself. Eat if you are truly hungry.
- Don’t skip meals. You will be more likely to crave other food and snack because you are hungry.
- Drink plenty of water. Dehydration can sometimes be mistaken for hunger. - Water will also make you feel full, so you’ll feel less hungry.
- Don’t keep foods you crave in the house. Don’t go shopping when you are hungry. You are more likely to buy temptation foods.
- IMPORTANTLY: Indulge once in a while so that you don’t feel deprived.
- Have a small portion of the food you crave. Plan special times for a treat.
- Exercise regularly. In addition to burning calories, regular exercise may relieve anxiety that can lead to the craving for comfort foods.

Affirmation: I am free to choose the foods I love that nourish my body and provide me with boundless energy to exercise regularly and appreciate the changes I am making everyday body and mind.







Val

Moving More! Eating Less!
Motivation gets you started, habit keeps you going!

EDWARDS1411's Photo EDWARDS1411 SparkPoints: (1,104,079)
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Posts: 289,676
1/14/14 1:16 P

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(#5 Write It Down)

www.mindfuleating.org/MindfulEating.
ht
ml
tells us that
Mindfulness is simply the moment-by-moment awareness of life. But it’s not always so simple. We so easily get caught up in our own thoughts and self-talk that we are scarcely aware of life as it passes us by. This is very true of our eating. We eat meal after meal, snack after snack, barely aware of what we’re eating and how much we’re consuming.

Mindfulness is a return to paying attention to life. When we pay attention to our food---really pay attention---we begin to notice all sorts of wonderful aspects of the food, and we become aware of how much we’re putting into our bodies.

www.webmd.com/diet/features/mindfuln
es
s-helps-healthy-lifestyle
suggests that mindfulness could be the key to weight loss success and gives us six ways to help. Here's

#5 Write It Down

It’s been proven time and time again, people who keep a food diary lose more weight. In one study, food loggers lost twice as much weight as people who didn’t write anything down.

Writing down what you eat will make you more aware of how much you eat. It will also help you keep an eye on the quality of food you eat. That awareness can lead to eating less and eventually losing weight.

www.webmd.com/diet/news/20120713/foo
d-
journal-write-it-down-shed-more-pounds
tells us that

- A 2008 study found that dieters who kept food diaries at least six days a week lost twice as much weight as those who kept the journals one day a week or less.
- Keeping a food diary helps increase awareness of mindless, distracted eating, says nutritionist and diabetes educator Megrette Fletcher, RD, who is also co-founder of The Center for Mindful Eating.
- "We know that when people keep food journals they are more aware of what they eat and in what quantities," she tells WebMD. "Whether the goal is to lose weight, keep diabetes under control, or just to avoid eating when you are not hungry, food journals can help."
- Most experts recommend writing down the foods you eat as soon as you eat them, rather than waiting until the end of the day.

Some other tips:
- It may also help to write down what you were doing when you were eating and how eating made you feel.
- Record your level of hunger along with the foods you eat.
- Be honest: Keeping a journal will do you no good if you only do it when you are being virtuous. Record the food slips along with the food triumphs.

I have been keeping a "food" journal for many years now and what started out as a food journal has evolved to become pretty much my "health" daytimer as I include special notes/thoughts of the day and upcoming appointments, exercise, water intake, weight, motivational quote for the day, SP notes, and anything else that strikes me at the time. And I manage to get it all on one page (most days LOL.) It's only 8 1/4" x 5 3/4" and I get my journals from the dollar store - they don't cost much, but are worth their weight in gold to me as I have continually referred back to my older ones for many different reasons. It works for me!!!

Affirmation: I am much more accountable for the foods I eat when I write them in my journal each day.

Val

Moving More! Eating Less!
Motivation gets you started, habit keeps you going!

EDWARDS1411's Photo EDWARDS1411 SparkPoints: (1,104,079)
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Posts: 289,676
1/14/14 1:07 P

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(#4 Set Your Mind On Slow)

www.mindfuleating.org/MindfulEating.
ht
ml
tells us that
Mindfulness is simply the moment-by-moment awareness of life. But it’s not always so simple. We so easily get caught up in our own thoughts and self-talk that we are scarcely aware of life as it passes us by. This is very true of our eating. We eat meal after meal, snack after snack, barely aware of what we’re eating and how much we’re consuming.

Mindfulness is a return to paying attention to life. When we pay attention to our food---really pay attention---we begin to notice all sorts of wonderful aspects of the food, and we become aware of how much we’re putting into our bodies.

www.webmd.com/diet/features/mindfuln
es
s-helps-healthy-lifestyle
suggests that mindfulness could be the key to weight loss success and gives us six ways to help. Here's

#4 Set Your Mind on Slow

Americans usually eat fast, spending just 8 to 11 minutes on a meal. Yet your body needs 20 minutes to register that it’s full.

Instead of gulping, take one bite, put your fork down, then chew slowly. Savor every morsel. Taking your time will make it much easier to tell when you’re full.

www.punchng.com/health/healthwise/ea
t-
slowly-and-mindfully/
tells us

• Slow eaters consume fewer calories than fast eaters.

• It takes time for your brain to receive the message of fullness (approximately 20 minutes).

• Mindless eating leads to increased calories. Practice mindful eating.

• Mindfulness is being present and paying attention in the moment to the one thing which you are doing now. It is the opposite of multitasking, because you use all of your senses and pay full attention to one process.

• When you eat mindfully, you sit down and really see the colours and textures of your food. You notice the aroma. When you put a bite into your mouth, you notice the feel and flavours. You chew (28 times) and enjoy each bite. You think about where the food came from and appreciate what it took to bring it to your table.

• Eating mindfully means that you are not reading, watching TV or driving while you eat.

• When you eat slowly and mindfully, you appreciate and fully taste your food. You are aware of when you are full and do not overeat.

Affirmation: I chew my food thoroughly, eat slowly and savor my meals.


Val

Moving More! Eating Less!
Motivation gets you started, habit keeps you going!

EDWARDS1411's Photo EDWARDS1411 SparkPoints: (1,104,079)
Fitness Minutes: (324,545)
Posts: 289,676
1/14/14 12:44 P

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(#3 There's No Accounting for Taste)

www.mindfuleating.org/MindfulEating.
ht
ml
tells us that
Mindfulness is simply the moment-by-moment awareness of life. But it’s not always so simple. We so easily get caught up in our own thoughts and self-talk that we are scarcely aware of life as it passes us by. This is very true of our eating. We eat meal after meal, snack after snack, barely aware of what we’re eating and how much we’re consuming.

Mindfulness is a return to paying attention to life. When we pay attention to our food---really pay attention---we begin to notice all sorts of wonderful aspects of the food, and we become aware of how much we’re putting into our bodies.

www.webmd.com/diet/features/mindfuln
es
s-helps-healthy-lifestyle
suggests that mindfulness could be the key to weight loss success and gives us six ways to help. Here's

#3 There’s No Accounting for Taste

Ever notice how the first bite or two always seems to taste the best? That’s because after that initial forkful your taste buds (of which you have thousands) stop firing.

“If you check in and and really notice how the pleasure level is changing, you may realize that you’ve had enough far sooner than you would if you were shoveling down your food,” says Jean L. Kristeller, PhD, developer of the Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training (MB-EAT) program.

www.ifnotdieting.com.au/cpa/htm/htm_
ar
ticle_view.asp?id=357
tells us that

- our taste buds are chemical sensors that get tired quite quickly.
- Unless we are very hungry, the first few bites of a food will taste better than the next few bites; after a larger amount, we may actually have very little taste experience left.
- What we are experiencing at that point may be the memory traces of those first bites.
- ...people will keep on eating in order to get back the intense flavor from the first few bites, something that's impossible to do.

Affirmation: I eat food slowly and use all of my senses to truly taste, smell, and fully experience eating mindfully and in so doing; I easily and naturally lose weight and am more open to all the joys of life.



Val

Moving More! Eating Less!
Motivation gets you started, habit keeps you going!

THM_DEB's Photo THM_DEB Posts: 4,396
1/14/14 4:45 A

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Thanks Val...later this week I'll find time to really check this out......

Deb

"Enemy" of motivation is the tendency to see yourself as the hapless victim of forces (or urges) over which you have no control."

My affiliate link:
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EDWARDS1411's Photo EDWARDS1411 SparkPoints: (1,104,079)
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1/7/14 1:54 P

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(#2 - Urge Surf)

www.mindfuleating.org/MindfulEating.
ht
ml
tells us that
Mindfulness is simply the moment-by-moment awareness of life. But it’s not always so simple. We so easily get caught up in our own thoughts and self-talk that we are scarcely aware of life as it passes us by. This is very true of our eating. We eat meal after meal, snack after snack, barely aware of what we’re eating and how much we’re consuming.

Mindfulness is a return to paying attention to life. When we pay attention to our food---really pay attention---we begin to notice all sorts of wonderful aspects of the food, and we become aware of how much we’re putting into our bodies.

www.webmd.com/diet/features/mindfuln
es
s-helps-healthy-lifestyle
suggests that mindfulness could be the key to weight loss success and gives us six ways to help. Here's

#2 - Urge Surf

Urge surfing is a technique that keeps you from giving in to spontaneous and unhealthy urges or cravings. Like all thoughts, urges don't last forever. They come and go, like a wave. Usually they last less than 30 minutes.

When you urge surf, you learn to "surf your cravings." That means you observe the urge. You accept it for what it is. But you don't respond to it.

Instead, notice how your body feels when the craving strikes. Then, pay attention to how its intensity changes with each breath you take.

Acknowledging the urge makes it weaker. And if you stay in this aware state, you can ride it out until your cravings are gone.

www.aliceboyes.com/urge-surfing/ tells us more about "urge surfing".

Ask yourself how strong your urge to eat what you are craving is on a scale of 0 to 10 where

0 = no urge
10 = the urge is so strong it seems impossible to resist.

Let’s say you rate your urge as a 10.

Next…

…wait 10 minutes.

Ideas for the kinds of things you might do while waiting: Go take a shower, get your clothes ready for tomorrow’s workday, read a book, or go remove any junk from your car.

Once the 10 minutes is up, check in with your urge again. How strong is it now?

Scenario A:

If, after the 10 minutes, the urge is still a 10, you will have learned that even though the level 10 urge seemed impossible to resist, it wasn’t.
In this scenario, try waiting another 10 mins and repeating the procedure.

Scenario B (MOST COMMON):

If, after the 10 minutes, the urge is now a 9 1/2 or less, you now know that the urge is becoming less strong without you needing to do anything other than wait (aka “urge surf” meaning to surf the wave of the urge).

Psychological Concepts and More Advice

1. Inherent in the idea of urge surfing is that action urges naturally ebb and flow. They don’t get “stuck on” unbearably high and stay unbearably high.

2. The point of the urge surfing concept is that many times all you need to do for an urge to diminish is to wait. However, particularly if your urge stays a 10 or you end up giving in and eating, you might want to spend some time trying to understand what triggered the urge.

Is the trigger physical? e.g. you’re tired, you have some type of physical pain, PMS?

Is the trigger emotional? e.g. Are you feeling lonely, sad, angry, disappointed, excited, anxious, bored, or guilty/ashamed? Are you avoiding or dreading something? Did something go wrong in your day? Have you experienced some type of interpersonal conflict, rejection, or frustration?

Is the trigger habitual? e.g. you’re watching a movie and you often eat while watching movies, so the act of watching the movie is triggering the urge to eat. Or, your husband is out and you often eat when you husband is out, so that situation is triggering the urge?

Is the trigger a combination of more than one of the above? (MOST COMMON) e.g. two emotional triggers, or an emotional and a habitual trigger.

It can sometimes help you figure out your trigger if you think about how you want to feel during/after eating e.g.
- If you want to feel more energized, this might indicate the trigger is tiredness or physical pain.
- If you want to feel soothed/calm/relaxed, this might indicate the trigger is some kind of anxiety or anger.- If you want to feel distracted, this might indicate the trigger is frustration, disappointment, loneliness, anger, anxiety, or you’re avoiding something.
- If you want to feel entertained, this might indicate the trigger is boredom or loneliness.
- If you want to feel nourished, this might indicate you’re in need of caring (you might need to do self care).

Sometimes understanding why the urge has popped up is enough to successfully urge surf.

Sometimes understanding why the urge has popped up gives you the information you need to pick an alternative coping response that’s a better match to the problem you’re trying to solve e.g. you’re tired so you have an early night or give yourself the night off from doing.

For your common triggers, you should have a list that says…
… when I feel X, doing A, B, C, or D is likely to help.
… when I feel Y, doing E, F, G, or H is likely to help.

3. Another urge surfing technique is to project ahead in time and think about how you’ll feel later (e.g. in 1/2 an hour, in 2 hours, tomorrow) if you give into the urge vs. how you’ll feel later if you do something else.

4. Sometimes after the initial 10 mins you might still decide to give into the urge (especially if it remains a 10). But, by using this procedure you’re likely to significantly cut down the proportion of times you give into the urge. Lets conservatively say waiting for 1 x 10 min reduces your instances of overeating in response to urges by 30%. Over time, this will mean you’re consuming significantly fewer extra calories. Successful weight management usually involves combining different techniques that each help a bit.

5. Even if you do give into the urge, allowing 10 minutes for the urge to diminish might allow the intensity of the urge to decrease enough that you can think about “harm minimization” e.g. if I’m going to eat ice cream, how can I make sure I only eat a regular serving size?

Don’t spend the initial 10 minutes thinking about your harm minimization options. If you decide to give into the urge, think about it then, after the initial 10 mins. is up.

Affirmation: I am free to choose the foods I love that nourish my body and provide me with boundless energy to exercise regularly and appreciate the changes I am making everyday body and mind.



Edited by: EDWARDS1411 at: 1/14/2014 (13:00)
Val

Moving More! Eating Less!
Motivation gets you started, habit keeps you going!

EDWARDS1411's Photo EDWARDS1411 SparkPoints: (1,104,079)
Fitness Minutes: (324,545)
Posts: 289,676
1/7/14 1:53 P

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www.mindfuleating.org/MindfulEating.
ht
ml
tells us that we eat meal after meal, snack after snack, barely aware of what we’re eating and how much we’re consuming. When we pay attention to our food---really pay attention---we begin to notice all sorts of wonderful aspects of the food, and we become aware of how much we’re putting into our bodies.

www.webmd.com/diet/features/mindfuln
es
s-helps-healthy-lifestyle
suggests that mindfulness could be the key to weight loss success and gives us six ways to help. Here's

#1 - Use Your Mind's Eye

Before every meal, pause and ask yourself: How hungry am I? Then, rate your hunger using a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 is ravenously hungry and 10 is totally full. Be really honest. When you take a moment to listen to your body, you may discover that you’re only at a 6.

“Even when we’re not very hungry, our tendency is to go on automatic: We pull into a drive-through and order the #4 combo meal because that’s what we always get,” says Megrette Fletcher, a dietitian and author of Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat with Diabetes.

Truth is, you may only need a snack to feel satisfied. Experts say you don’t want to eat until you’re stuffed. Aim for about three-quarters full, which is between a 7 and an 8.

There are a total of 6 tips which I will post over the next several days.

Affirmation: I trust myself and my body to guide me to eat when I’m physically hungry, stop when comfortably satisfied, and to use my voice to express my feelings and thoughts directly.

Edited by: EDWARDS1411 at: 1/14/2014 (12:52)
Val

Moving More! Eating Less!
Motivation gets you started, habit keeps you going!

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