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Chew Slowly to Prevent Heartburn

Heartburn may feel like your heart is on fire, but what’s “burning” is actually your esophagus. Acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), occurs when the stomach acids enter the esophagus, causing pain and burning sensations. Left untreated, GERD can lead to serious medical consequences, including narrowing of the esophagus, bleeding, or even a condition called Barrett’s esophagus, which increases your risk of developing esophageal cancer.

But experts have found a simple way to prevent GERD in the first place: Eat more slowly. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston fed 690-calorie meals to 10 healthy volunteers, instructing them to finish the meal in either five or 30 minutes on alternating days. Participants were monitored for two hours after finishing their meals. Those who took 30 minutes to eat experienced fewer episodes of acid reflux or GERD compared to subject who finished eating in five minutes.

Action Sparked
Most people need to work on slowing down many areas of their lives, and mealtime is a perfect place to start. Besides aiding your digestion, eating your meals slowly can help your waistline too, by giving your stomach a chance to communicate to your brain that it’s full. Time yourself, just to see how long it takes you to eat an average meal. Try to take a full 20-30 minutes (you might have to build up to this slowly) to finish your food. If you are experiencing heartburn or discomfort after meals on a regular basis, see your doctor, before GERD causes irreversible damage.
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Member Comments

Didn't know that. Thanks. Report
Thank you for the information. Report
This is definitely true for me. I'm following the Beck Diet Solution programme, and I have taught myself to eat more slowly by putting down my fork after every three bites and drinking some water. I've always struggled to drink 8 glasses of water/day; since I started this "forced slow down", I am drinking 8-10 glasses of water every day.

Gail Report
ORANGECHEF
Someone said using a chopsticks slowed them down. Not me, I was taught chopsticks before silverware. So Iím just the opposite. I really enjoy my food with chopsticks but I tend to eat slower with silverware. Caught in the middle I am. Report
Good article. Report
good info Report
I have Gastroparesis and I have always been a slow eater and I still have heartburn after I eat or even just drinking water. Report
Great tips! Thanks! Report
That's why you have to eat before you get too hungry or else eating slowly goes out the window. Preparation preparation preparation..... Report
I like to put down my utensils between bites and have a sip of water. Also, I try to talk between bites. And as odd as this sounds, I cut my food into smaller pieces so it takes longer to eat and I won't just gobble it down :) Report
As a teacher with only a 30 minute lunch break this is easier said than done but I will try to be more slow when I eat. Report
My husband always puts his fork down when he is eating. I asked him why and he said his mother told him to do so. Eventually I decided to put my fork down and when I eat like a sandwich, I put that down on my plate or napkin. Once your mouth is empty pick up your food again. It does prolong the meal but I have much less heart burn. I used to complain to the DR and I was given medication. I did not like taking medication. Thanks to my spouse I rarely have heartburn. Pat in Maine. Report
I had surgery last year because the valve between my esophagus and stomach never closed...resultin
g in severe GERD and regurgitation from the time I was a small child. Now I MUST eat slowly because the food doesn't go down as easily. I find that I eat a lot less now that my meals take about 30 minutes. Report
I use a timer for 20 min. and make sure I chew well. Report
Thanks I needed that. I am always told by my baby I eat my food too fast. Report
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About The Author

Liza Barnes
Liza Barnes
Liza has two bachelor's degrees: one in health promotion and education and a second in nursing. A registered nurse and mother, regular exercise and cooking are top priorities for her. See all of Liza's articles.